Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Cancer Imaging & Early Detection Profiles

Showing 21 - 30 of 40
    Redlich Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Sean Mackey, M.D., Ph.D, is Chief of the Division of Pain Medicine and Redlich Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Neurosciences and Neurology at Stanford University. He is the Immediate Past President of the American Academy of Pain Medicine. Dr. Mackey received his BSE and MSE in Bioengineering from University of Pennsylvania and his PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering as well as MD from University of Arizona. Dr. Mackey is author of over 200 journal articles, book chapters, abstracts, and popular press pieces in addition to numerous national and international lectures. Under Dr. Mackey’s leadership, the Stanford Pain Management Center has been designated a Center of Excellence by the American Pain Society, one of only two centers to receive this honor twice. In 2011 he was a member of the Institutes of Medicine committee that issued the report on Relieving Pain in America. He is currently Co-Chair of the Oversight Committee for the NIH/Health and Human Services National Pain Strategy, an effort to establish a national health strategy for pain care, education and research. Under Dr. Sean Mackey’s leadership, researchers at the Stanford Pain Management Center and the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Laboratory (SNAPL) have made major advances in the understanding of chronic pain as a disease in its own right, one that fundamentally alters the nervous system. Dr. Mackey has overseen efforts to map the specific brain and spinal cord regions that perceive and process pain, which has led to the development of a multidisciplinary treatment model that translates basic science research into innovative therapies to provide more effective, personalized treatments for patients with chronic pain.
    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Cancer Early Detection-Canary Center)
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Tarik Massoud is a Professor of Neuroradiology and Molecular Imaging in the Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, where he directs LEMNI (the Laboratory of Experimental and Molecular Neuroimaging), and is an Attending Neuroradiologist in Stanford Health Care. He qualified from the Medical School of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland and then served as intern to two inspirational medical giants of their days, Dr. William H. (Willie) Bisset at the Royal Hospital for Sick Children in Edinburgh, UK, and Professor Sir Raymond (Bill) Hoffenberg, PRCP, at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham, UK. He trained in Radiology and Neuroradiology in Oxford, UCLA, and the University of Michigan, and is a Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists in London. He holds a research MD degree (NUI) in experimental neuroimaging (work conducted at UCLA), and a Cambridge PhD in molecular imaging (work conducted at the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging at UCLA, and the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Gambhir laboratory). From 2000 to 2013 he was a University Lecturer and Honorary Consultant in Neuroradiology at the University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine and Addenbrooke’s Hospital in Cambridge, UK. He was formerly an Assistant and Associate Professor of Radiology at UCLA, and held visiting Associate Professorships at Columbia and MCW, Milwaukee. He has published extensively and won numerous awards at scientific meetings. His papers in experimental interventional neuroradiology and molecular imaging are widely cited. He has been a peer reviewer for dozens of international medical journals, as well as other medical charities and governmental funding agencies. He is Editor-in-Chief of the journal Reports in Medical Imaging, and an editorial board member for numerous biomedical journals. In 2016 he was awarded a Special Faculty Permit ('eminent physician license') by the Medical Board of the State of California.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)

    Bio

    Mike Moseley has been a Professor of Radiology in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory at the Stanford University Lucas Center since 1993, before which he was in Radiology at UCSF during the rapid rise of MR in the 1980’s. His doctorate from Uppsala University Sweden in 1980 and postdoctoral work at the Weizmann Institute in Israel until 1982 focused on using diffusion NMR to investigate biological structures from proton relaxation and diffusion dynamics. A member of the early SMRM and the SMRI, he has been active in guiding MR societies, serving as the first Annual Meeting Program Chair for the newly merged ISMRM in 1996 and becoming an ISMRM Fellow in 1998. He also co-founded the DWI PWI Study Group within the ISMRM. He was awarded the ISMRM Gold Medal in 2001 for his pioneering work in diffusion MRI. Elected to the ISMRM Board in 2002, he served as the 2003-2004 President of the ISMRM for the Kyoto Japan meeting. In 2007, he was recognized as an Honorary Member of the Society for Magnetic Resonance Technologists (SMRT). In 2014, Dr. Moseley was elected as the Cruse-Kressel Awardee by the SMRT. Dr. Moseley has served on a variety of editorial boards and has co-authored three books, 30 book chapters and over 480 articles together with many meeting scientific abstracts and invited lectures. With an H-Index of 82, his articles have been cited over 23,000 times. His primary current research interests have centered on developing MR methods to detect the earliest events of experimental and clinical cerebral vascular diseases using functional neuroimaging (DWI, PWI, and fMRI) methods. As one of the first investigators in vascular MR using blood-pool agents and stereoscopic MR, Dr. Moseley was the first to show in 1989 that mapping white matter fiber orientation using diffusion MRI was a novel measure of neuroimaging and now later as a means of mapping cognitive performance. He has participated in regional and international SMRT and ISMRM Outreach meetings, co-authored and reviewed for the SMRT Home Studies, and directs a Stanford summer course hosted for the Japanese Society of Radiological Technologists (JSRT).
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Medical Informatics) and of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    My primary interests are in developing diagnostic and therapy-planning applications and strategies for the acquisition, visualization, and quantitation of multi-dimensional medical imaging data. Examples are: creation of three-dimensional images of blood vessels using CT, visualization of complex flow within blood vessels using MR, computer-aided detection and characterization of lesions (e.g., colonic polyps, pulmonary nodules) from cross-sectional image data, visualization and automated assessment of 4D ultrasound data, and fusion of images acquired using different modalities (e.g., CT and MR). I have also been involved in developing and evaluating techniques for exploring cross-sectional imaging data from an internal perspective, i.e., virtual endoscopy (including colonoscopy, angioscopy, and bronchoscopy), and in the quantitation of structure parameters, e.g., volumes, lengths, medial axes, and curvatures. I am also interested in creating workable solutions to the problem of "data explosion," i.e., how to look at the thousands of images generated per examination using modern CT and MR scanners. My most recent focus includes making image features computer-accessible, to facilitate content-based retrieval of similar lesions, and prediction of molecular phenotype, response to therapy, and prognosis from imaging features. I am co-director of the Radiology 3D and Quantitative Imaging Lab, providing clinical service to the Stanford and local community, and co-Director of IBIIS (Integrative Biomedical Imaging Informatics at Stanford), whose mission is to advance the clinical and basic sciences in radiology, while improving our understanding of biology and the manifestations of disease, by pioneering methods in the information sciences that integrate imaging, clinical and molecular data.
    Addie and Al Macovski Professor in the School of Engineering

    Bio

    Nishimura develops new acquisition and processing techniques for improved medical imaging.
    Assistant Professor of Radiology (Body Imaging) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Associate Professor (Research) of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Electrical Engineering
    Reid Weaver Dennis Professor

    Bio

    Interests include medical imaging generally, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in particular. Current efforts are focused on medical applications of MRI where real-time interactive imaging is important. Two examples are cardiac imaging, and the interactive guidance of interventional procedures. Specific interests include rapid methods for the excitation and acquisition of the MR signal, and the reconstruction of images from the data acquired using these approaches.

Affiliations

Organizations