Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Profiles

Showing 151 - 160 of 462
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)
    Associate Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Bio

    Henry T. "Hank" Greely is the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics at Stanford University. He specializes in ethical, legal, and social issues arising from advances in the biosciences, particularly from genetics, neuroscience, and human stem cell research. He chairs the California Advisory Committee on Human Stem Cell Research and the steering committee of the Stanford University Center for Biomedical Ethics, and directs the Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences and the Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society. He serves as a member of the NAS Committee on Science, Technology, and Law; the NIGMS Advisory Council, the Institute of Medicine’s Neuroscience Forum, and the NIH Multi-Center Working Group on the BRAIN Initiative. Professor Greely graduated from Stanford in 1974 and from Yale Law School in 1977. He served as a law clerk for Judge John Minor Wisdom on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and for Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He began teaching at Stanford in 1985.
    Co-Director, Spectrum, Associate Dean, Research, The Joseph D. Grant Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    Professor of Medicine (Hematology), Emeritus

    Bio

    As Director of the Stanford MDS Center, Dr Greenberg has an active clinical practice focusing on myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and clonal myeloid disorders. His clinical research involves design and coordination of clinical trials using experimental drugs with biologic focus for both lower and higher risk MDS patients not responding to standard therapies. He is Coordinator of the International Working Group for Prognosis in MDS (IWG-PM) which generated the revised MDS classification system (the IPSS-R) and is now evaluating the impact of molecular mutations on this risk-based prognostic system. He is Chair of the NCCN Practice Guidelines Panel for MDS.
    Executive Director - SCI Strategic Communications and Outreach, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Bio

    William Greenleaf is an Assistant Professor in the Genetics Department at Stanford University School of Medicine, with a courtesy appointment in the Applied Physics Department. He is a member of Bio-X, the Biophysics Program, the Biomedical Informatics Program, and the Cancer Center. He received an A.B. in physics from Harvard University (summa cum laude) in 2002, and received a Gates Fellowship to study computer science for one year in Trinity College, Cambridge, UK (with distinction). After this experience abroad, he returned to Stanford to carry out his Ph.D. in Applied Physics in the laboratory of Steven Block, where he investigated, at the single molecule level, the chemo-mechanics of RNA polymerase and the folding of RNA transcripts. He conducted postdoctoral work in the laboratory of X. Sunney Xie in the Chemistry and Chemical Biology Department at Harvard University, where he was awarded a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Fellowship, and developed new fluorescence-based high-throughput sequencing methodologies. He moved to Stanford as an Assistant Professor in November 2011. Since beginning his lab, he has been named a Rita Allen Foundation Young Scholar, an Ellison Foundation Young Scholar in Aging (declined), a Baxter Foundation Scholar, and a Chan-Zuckerberg Investigator. His highly interdisciplinary research links molecular biology, computer science, bioengineering, and genomics a to understand how the physical state of the human genome controls gene regulation and biological state. Efforts in his lab are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing and cutting-edge microscopies, and bringing these new technologies to bear against basic biological questions of genomic and epigenomic variation. His long-term goal is to unlock an understanding of the physical “regulome” — i.e. the factors that control how the genetic information is read into biological instructions — profoundly impacting our understanding of how cells maintain, or fail to maintain, their state in health and disease.
    Johnson & Johnson Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Gastroenterology and Hepatology)
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Primary Care and Population Health) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System, Emeritus

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