Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Profiles

Showing 141 - 150 of 462
    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, and by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Surgery

    Bio

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Associate Chair for Research & Director of the Division of Radiation & Cancer Biology in the Department of Radiation Oncology. He also is the Director of Basic Science at the Stanford Cancer Institute and heads the Radiation Biology Program in Stanford’s Cancer Center, and is Director of the Cancer Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Program. He was awarded an American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award and the Michael Fry Award from the Radiation Research Society for his outstanding contributions on understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance promoted by the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, he was the recipient of the 2013 ASTRO Gold Medal. In 2015, he was awarded an NIH R35 Outstanding Investigator Award and was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine. He co-authored the sixth & seventh editions of the textbook, “Radiation Biology for the Radiologist,” with Professor Eric Hall from Columbia. In addition, he is currently the “Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor in Cancer Biology” in the Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Kathryn Simmons Stamey Professor

    Bio

    Dr Gill focuses on all aspects of surgical treatment of urologic malignancies and is experienced in both open and minimally invasive surgery including robotic surgery. He has collaborated with multiple subspecialists and has published on many facets of urologic oncology. Dr Gill’s practice and research also focuses on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and he offers all minimally invasive therapies for this condition. He is also actively involved in developing and studying new minimally invasive devises for the treatment of BPH.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    My research interests encompass the physics and mathematics of imaging with Magnetic Resonance (MR). My research is directed in part towards exploration of rapid MRI scanning methods using spiral and other non-Cartesian k-space trajectories for dynamic imaging of function. Using spiral techniques, we have developed MRI pulse sequences and processing methods for mapping cortical brain function by imaging the metabolic response to various stimuli, with applications in the basic neurosciences as well as for clinical applications. These methods develop differential image contrast from hemodynamically driven increases in oxygen content in the vascular bed of activated cortex (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent, or BOLD contrast), using pulse sequences sensitive to the paramagnetic behavior of deoxyhemoglobin or to the blood flow changes. Other interests include multimodal imaging using fMRI in conjunction with EEG, fPET, fNIRS, and neuromodulation with tDCS, tACS, TMS and HiFU. Investigating viscoelasticity of human brain using MR Elastography is of interest as an alternative to BOLD contrast for depicting brain activation.
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford Cancer Center

    Bio

    Zinaida Good is specializing in computational immunology, cancer immunotherapy, and lymphocyte development. She is a new Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy Scholar who started her postdoctoral training with Crystal Mackall (CAR T cells) and Sylvia Plevritis (Cancer Systems Biology) at Stanford University in April 2018. During her Ph.D. studies in Computational & Systems Immunology at Stanford University, she trained with Garry Nolan and Sean Bendall. Her projects included: (1) predicting clinical outcomes for children with leukemia based on single-cell mass cytometry data; (2) guiding T-cell differentiation in the context of ex vivo expansion for cancer immunotherapy applications; and (3) comparing dimensionality reduction methods for single-cell data. Her background is in immunology (B.Sc. and M.Sc. from University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada) and oncology (she worked in Discovery Oncology at Genentech for 2 years). Her long-term interest is in the systems-level events required for a coordinated immune attack against cancer, as such insights can be applied to benefit patients by boosting the attack efficacy of endogenous or engineered immune cells.
    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio

    Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD is Associate Dean of Clinical and Translational Research and Professor of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, directing Stanford's CTSA/Spectrum training programs in medical research methods and serving as chief of the Division of Epidemiology in HRP. He is co-founder and co-director of the Meta-research innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS), a group dedicated to examining and improving the reproducibility and efficiency of biomedical research. Dr. Goodman's own research concerns the proper measurement, conceptualization and synthesis of research evidence, with particular emphasis on Bayesian approaches to quantitation, and qualitative approaches arising from the philosophy of science. He is also interested in developing methods to use shared data to confirm and extend published science, as well as to explore new hypotheses. He also has worked on the connections between ethics and scientific methods, particularly in the domain of interventional research, and policy making. Finally, he has a strong interest in developing curricula and new models for teaching the foundations of good scientific practice, from question development to proper study design, conduct, analysis and inference. He has been a senior statistical editor of Annals of Internal Medicine since 1987 and was Editor of Clinical Trials: Journal of the Society for Clinical Trials from 2004-2013. He is Vice-chair of the Methodology Committee of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), where he leads their open science and data sharing efforts, and is scientific advisor for the national Blue Cross–Blue Shield Technology Assessment Program. He has served on numerous Institute of Medicine committees since the mid 1990's, including chairing a 2012 committee on drug safety, and as a committee member on sharing data from clinical trials, whose report was released in January, 2015. Most recently, he served on an advisory group to the NIH director on the future of the National Library of Medicine, and was awarded the 2016 Spinoza Chair in Medicine from the University of Amsterdam. From 1989-2011, Steve served on the faculties of the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health, where he was co-director of the doctoral program in Epidemiology and member (1989-2011) and then director (2007-2011) of the Johns Hopkins cancer center’s Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics. At Hopkins, he taught courses on Systematic reviews and Meta-analysis, Diagnostic and prognostic testing, and several courses on epidemiologic, clinical research and inferential methods. He received an AB from Harvard, majoring in Biochemistry and Applied Math, an MD from NYU, trained in pediatrics at Washington University in St. Louis, and received a master’s degree in Biostatistics and PhD in Epidemiology from Johns Hopkins.
    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor of Biology
    Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Dita Gratzinger is an academic hematopathologist who studies the microarchitecture of supporting cells in the microenvironment in bone marrow and lymph node pathology. Her publications span the role of the microenvironment in myelodysplastic syndromes, the relationship of cutaneous lymphomas to lymphatic vasculature, and manifestations of immune dysregulation in lymphoid tissues. She co-organized and co-chaired the 2015 workshop on Immunodeficiency and Dysregulation for the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology, and gives a short course on the Bone Marrow Manifestations of Systemic Disease at annual meetings of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology. As program director for the hematopathology fellowship at Stanford and as a member of the College of American Pathologists Graduate Medical Education Committee, Dr. Gratzinger foregrounds patient-centered team-based care in pathology training. Dr. Gratzinger received her B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1996, her M.D. and PhD from Yale University in 2003, and completed her anatomic pathology residency, surgical pathology fellowship, and hematopathology fellowship at Stanford University in 2007.

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