Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Profiles

Showing 141 - 150 of 461
    Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Stanford Cancer Center
    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio

    Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD is Associate Dean of Clinical and Translational Research and Professor of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, directing Stanford's CTSA/Spectrum training programs in medical research methods and serving as chief of the Division of Epidemiology in HRP. He is co-founder and co-director of the Meta-research innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS), a group dedicated to examining and improving the reproducibility and efficiency of biomedical research. Dr. Goodman's own research concerns the proper measurement, conceptualization and synthesis of research evidence, with particular emphasis on Bayesian approaches to quantitation, and qualitative approaches arising from the philosophy of science. He is also interested in developing methods to use shared data to confirm and extend published science, as well as to explore new hypotheses. He also has worked on the connections between ethics and scientific methods, particularly in the domain of interventional research, and policy making. Finally, he has a strong interest in developing curricula and new models for teaching the foundations of good scientific practice, from question development to proper study design, conduct, analysis and inference. He has been a senior statistical editor of Annals of Internal Medicine since 1987 and was Editor of Clinical Trials: Journal of the Society for Clinical Trials from 2004-2013. He is Vice-chair of the Methodology Committee of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), where he leads their open science and data sharing efforts, and is scientific advisor for the national Blue Cross–Blue Shield Technology Assessment Program. He has served on numerous Institute of Medicine committees since the mid 1990's, including chairing a 2012 committee on drug safety, and as a committee member on sharing data from clinical trials, whose report was released in January, 2015. Most recently, he served on an advisory group to the NIH director on the future of the National Library of Medicine, and was awarded the 2016 Spinoza Chair in Medicine from the University of Amsterdam. From 1989-2011, Steve served on the faculties of the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health, where he was co-director of the doctoral program in Epidemiology and member (1989-2011) and then director (2007-2011) of the Johns Hopkins cancer center’s Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics. At Hopkins, he taught courses on Systematic reviews and Meta-analysis, Diagnostic and prognostic testing, and several courses on epidemiologic, clinical research and inferential methods. He received an AB from Harvard, majoring in Biochemistry and Applied Math, an MD from NYU, trained in pediatrics at Washington University in St. Louis, and received a master’s degree in Biostatistics and PhD in Epidemiology from Johns Hopkins.
    Professor of Medicine (Hematology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor of Biology
    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Associate Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Dita Gratzinger is an academic hematopathologist who studies the microarchitecture of supporting cells in the microenvironment in bone marrow and lymph node pathology. Her publications span the role of the microenvironment in myelodysplastic syndromes, the relationship of cutaneous lymphomas to lymphatic vasculature, and manifestations of immune dysregulation in lymphoid tissues. She co-organized and co-chaired the 2015 workshop on Immunodeficiency and Dysregulation for the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology, and gives a short course on the Bone Marrow Manifestations of Systemic Disease at annual meetings of the United States and Canadian Academy of Pathology. As program director for the hematopathology fellowship at Stanford and as a member of the College of American Pathologists Graduate Medical Education Committee, Dr. Gratzinger foregrounds patient-centered team-based care in pathology training. Dr. Gratzinger received her B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley in 1996, her M.D. and PhD from Yale University in 2003, and completed her anatomic pathology residency, surgical pathology fellowship, and hematopathology fellowship at Stanford University in 2007.
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)
    Assistant Professor of Pathology and of Pediatrics at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and, Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics

    Bio

    Henry T. "Hank" Greely is the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law and Professor, by courtesy, of Genetics at Stanford University. He specializes in ethical, legal, and social issues arising from advances in the biosciences, particularly from genetics, neuroscience, and human stem cell research. He chairs the California Advisory Committee on Human Stem Cell Research and the steering committee of the Stanford University Center for Biomedical Ethics, and directs the Stanford Center for Law and the Biosciences and the Stanford Program in Neuroscience and Society. He serves as a member of the NAS Committee on Science, Technology, and Law; the NIGMS Advisory Council, the Institute of Medicine’s Neuroscience Forum, and the NIH Multi-Center Working Group on the BRAIN Initiative. Professor Greely graduated from Stanford in 1974 and from Yale Law School in 1977. He served as a law clerk for Judge John Minor Wisdom on the United States Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit and for Justice Potter Stewart of the United States Supreme Court. He began teaching at Stanford in 1985.
    Professor of Medicine (Hematology), Emeritus

    Bio

    Dr Greenberg’s laboratory research focuses on evaluating molecular abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) with specific interest in gene expression profiling of marrow stem and progenitor cells using RNA Seq and microarray methodologies and proteomic analysis of aberrant antigen expression in plasma. As Director of the Stanford MDS Center his clinical research involves design and coordination of clinical trials using experimental drugs with biologic focus for both lower and higher risk MDS patients not responding to standard therapies. He is Coordinator of the International Working Group for Prognosis in MDS (IWG-PM) which generated the revised MDS classification system (the IPSS-R) and is now evaluating the impact of molecular mutations on this risk-based prognostic system. He is Chair of the NCCN Practice Guidelines Panel for MDS.

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