Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Stanford Cancer Institute Profiles

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    Younger Family Professor and Professor of Structural Biology
    Rehnborg Farquhar Professor

    Bio

    For the past 20 years most of my research has been focused on investigating the potential health benefits of various dietary components or food patterns, which have been explored in the context of randomized controlled trials in free-living adult populations. Some of the interventions have involved vegetarian diets, soy foods and soy food components, garlic, omega-3 fats/fish oil/flax oil, antioxidants, Ginkgo biloba, and popular weight loss diets. These trials have ranged in duration from 8 weeks to a year, with study outcomes that have included weight, blood lipids and lipoproteins, inflammatory markers, glucose, insulin, blood pressure and body composition. Most of these trials have been NIH-funded. In 2012 we were funded by NIH to conduct a 5-year low-carb vs. low-fat weight loss study among overweight and obese adults after genotyping them and assigning them to a diet that we believe they are more vs. less likely to succeed on based on potential genetic predisposition. One of the secondary hypotheses is that insulin resistance will be a moderator of success on the two diets. The original NIH study was generously augmented by the Nutrition Science Initiative (NuSI) and a group of donors, allowing us to increase the sample size from 400 to 600 individuals, to add analyses of the microbiome in a subset of participants, and to bring in additional collaborators. As of June 2015 recruitment and enrollment was completed, with a final sample of n=609 randomized. The 12-month diet protocol for the the final participants enrolled will be completed by spring of 2016, and we expect main results by the end of 2016 or early 2017. As of 2015 our nutrition research team is also participating in two multisite studies, one on sodium intake, and another on Vitamin D supplementation. In the past few years my long-term research interests have shifted to include a second line of inquiry that falls more under the umbrella of Community Based Participatory Research (CBPR). This shift came from the recent realization and appreciation that focusing on "health" as a motivator for changing and improving human food behaviors can drastically limit the potential impact for change. This realization led me to initiate the first annual Stanford Food Summit in 2010. The first Stanford Food Summit in 2010 was attended by hundreds of scholars from across all seven of Stanford's undergraduate and graduate schools (Medicine, Earth Sciences, Humanities and Sciences, Engineering, Law, Business and Education). The subsequent four Stanford Food Summit (2011, 2012 2013, 2014) have provided forums to present the work and findings of several new community-academic partnerships (e.g., Full Circle Farm in Sunnyvale, CA, and Second Harvest Food Bank in San Mateo and Santa Clara counties). The partnerships have been formed through CBPR pilot project funding that we were able to provide due to several generous donors who attended our Food Summits and were inspired by our vision for solution-oriented approaches to food system problems. My long-term vision in this area is to create a world-class Stanford Food Systems Initiative, and build on the idea that Stanford is uniquely positioned geographically, culturally, and academically, to address national and global crises in the areas of obesity and diabetes that are directly related to our broken food systems.
    Assistant Professor (Research) of Medicine (BMIR) and, by courtesy, of Biomedical Data Science

    Bio

    BSc (Hons) Physics, University of Manchester, UK PhD Theoretical particle physics, University of Southampton, UK
    Assistant Professor of Medicine (Biomedical Informatics Research) and of Biomedical Data Science
    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, and by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Surgery

    Bio

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Associate Chair for Research & Director of the Division of Radiation & Cancer Biology in the Department of Radiation Oncology. He also is the Director of Basic Science at the Stanford Cancer Institute and heads the Radiation Biology Program in Stanford’s Cancer Center, and is Director of the Cancer Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Program. He was awarded an American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award and the Michael Fry Award from the Radiation Research Society for his outstanding contributions on understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance promoted by the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, he was the recipient of the 2013 ASTRO Gold Medal. In 2015, he was awarded an NIH R35 Outstanding Investigator Award and was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine. He co-authored the sixth & seventh editions of the textbook, “Radiation Biology for the Radiologist,” with Professor Eric Hall from Columbia. In addition, he is currently the “Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor in Cancer Biology” in the Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Kathryn Simmons Stamey Professor

    Bio

    Dr Gill focuses on all aspects of surgical treatment of urologic malignancies and is experienced in both open and minimally invasive surgery including robotic surgery. He has collaborated with multiple subspecialists and has published on many facets of urologic oncology. Dr Gill’s practice and research also focuses on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and he offers all minimally invasive therapies for this condition. He is also actively involved in developing and studying new minimally invasive devises for the treatment of BPH.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    My research interests encompass the physics and mathematics of imaging with Magnetic Resonance. Presently my research is directed in part towards exploration of rapid MRI scanning methods using spiral and other non-Cartesian k-space trajectories for dynamic imaging of function. Using spiral techniques, we have developed MRI pulse sequences and processing methods for mapping cortical brain function by imaging the metabolic response to various stimuli, with applications in the basic neurosciences as well as for clinical applications. These methods develop differential image contrast from hemodynamically driven increases in oxygen content in the vascular bed of activated cortex, using pulse sequences sensitive to the paramagnetic behavior of deoxyhemoglobin or to the blood flow changes. Other applications include imaging of contrast uptake in the breast.
    Emeritus Faculty, Acad Council, Miscellaneous
    Professor of Medicine (General Medical Disciplines) and of Health Research and Policy (Epidemiology)

    Bio

    Steven Goodman, MD, MHS, PhD is Associate Dean of Clinical and Translational Research and Professor of Medicine and of Health Research & Policy, directing Stanford's CTSA/Spectrum training programs in medical research methods and serving as chief of the Division of Epidemiology in HRP. He is co-founder and co-director of the Meta-research innovation Center at Stanford (METRICS), a group dedicated to examining and improving the reproducibility and efficiency of biomedical research. Dr. Goodman's own research concerns the proper measurement, conceptualization and synthesis of research evidence, with particular emphasis on Bayesian approaches to quantitation, and qualitative approaches arising from the philosophy of science. He is also interested in developing methods to use shared data to confirm and extend published science, as well as to explore new hypotheses. He also has worked on the connections between ethics and scientific methods, particularly in the domain of interventional research, and policy making. Finally, he has a strong interest in developing curricula and new models for teaching the foundations of good scientific practice, from question development to proper study design, conduct, analysis and inference. He has been a senior statistical editor of Annals of Internal Medicine since 1987 and was Editor of Clinical Trials: Journal of the Society for Clinical Trials from 2004-2013. He is Vice-chair of the Methodology Committee of the Patient Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), where he leads their open science and data sharing efforts, and is scientific advisor for the national Blue Cross–Blue Shield Technology Assessment Program. He has served on numerous Institute of Medicine committees since the mid 1990's, including chairing a 2012 committee on drug safety, and as a committee member on sharing data from clinical trials, whose report was released in January, 2015. Most recently, he served on an advisory group to the NIH director on the future of the National Library of Medicine, and was awarded the 2016 Spinoza Chair in Medicine from the University of Amsterdam. From 1989-2011, Steve served on the faculties of the Johns Hopkins Schools of Medicine and Public Health, where he was co-director of the doctoral program in Epidemiology and member (1989-2011) and then director (2007-2011) of the Johns Hopkins cancer center’s Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics. At Hopkins, he taught courses on Systematic reviews and Meta-analysis, Diagnostic and prognostic testing, and several courses on epidemiologic, clinical research and inferential methods. He received an AB from Harvard, majoring in Biochemistry and Applied Math, an MD from NYU, trained in pediatrics at Washington University in St. Louis, and received a master’s degree in Biostatistics and PhD in Epidemiology from Johns Hopkins.

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