Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Stanford Cancer Institute Profiles

Showing 121 - 130 of 458
    George D. Smith Professor in Molecular and Genetic Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Genetics
    Clinical Associate Professor, Pediatrics - Hematology & Oncology
    Bing Director of the Program in Human Biology, Beirne Family Professor of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, Professor of Pediatrics and, by courtesy, of Neurosurgery at SUMC

    Bio

    Dr. Paul Graham Fisher is Chief of the Division of Child Neurology. He started his academic career at Johns Hopkins, and in 1997 he was recruited back to Stanford, where he started the pediatric brain tumor program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. That childhood brain tumor program is now one of the largest, comprehensive childhood brain tumor centers for research and care in the Western United States, and a member of the National Cancer Institute’s Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium. Professor Fisher is a nationally sought teacher, and in 2007 he received both the 44th Annual Arthur L. Bloomfield Award and 39th Annual Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Award for excellence in teaching at the Stanford School of Medicine. At Stanford he also teaches the popular undergraduate class “Cancer Epidemiology” in Human Biology. He is an Associate Editor for The Journal of Pediatrics, and an editorial board member for Journal of Neuro-Oncology.
    Colleen Haas Chair in the School of Medicine

    Bio

    I conduct clinical research on a variety of gastrointestinal cancers and provide care for patients with those cancers. We have trials of combined modality therapy (surgery +/- radiation +/- chemotherapy) on gastric, esophageal, pancreas and rectal cancers. We also perform phase I and II trials of biologically targeted agents as well as newer immunotherapeutics. In collaboration with a number of colleagues, we conduct translational studies analyzing novel imaging (e.g. contrast enhanced ultrasound and perfusion scans) and molecular biomarkers (e.g. CDX2 as a prognostic and predictive factor in colon cancer and matrix metalloproteinases as prognostic factors in pancreas cancer). Neuroendocrine tumors, pancreas, colorectal and gastro-esophageal cancers have been areas of particular research focus with multiple therapeutic and translational studies devote to each. Examples of recently completed trials include a randomized phase III trial of a vaccine (algenpantucel) for resected pancreas cancer, phase Ib trial of anti-PD-L1 and separate phase II trials using PD-1 antibody for tumors with micro satellite instability and chemotherapy with angiogenesis inhibitors for advanced neuroendocrine tumors and gastro-esophageal adenocarcinomas. Currently active areas of study include combining immunomodulating antibodies in combination therapy and randomized phase II colon cancer trials of an antibody to interleukin 1 or a first in class agent known as RadioRx. Participation and leadership in NCI cooperative group protocols gives our patients access to the randomized trials that hope to establish new standards of care for a variety of GI cancers.
    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Bio

    Dr. Ford is a medical oncologist and geneticist at Stanford, devoted to studying the genetic basis of breast and GI cancer development, treatment and prevention. Dr. Ford graduated in 1984 Magna Cum Laude (Biology) from Yale University where he later received his M.D. degree from the School of Medicine in 1989. He was a internal medicine resident (1989-91), Clinical Fellow in Medical Oncology (1991-94), Research Fellow of Biological Sciences (1993-97) at Stanford, and joined the faculty in 1998. He is currently Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and Genetics, and Director of the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic and the Cancer Genomics Program at the Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Ford’s research goals are to understand the role of genetic changes in cancer genes in the risk and development of common cancers. He studies the role of the p53 and BRCA1 tumor suppressor genes in DNA repair, and uses techniques for high-throughput genomic analyses of cancer to identify molecular signatures for targeted therapies. Dr. Ford’s clinical interests include the diagnosis and treatment of patients with a hereditary pre-disposition to cancer. He runs the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic, that sees patients for genetic counseling and testing of hereditary cancer syndromes for prevention and early diagnosis of cancer in high-risk individuals and populations. He has recently been named the Director of Stanford’s new Cancer Genomics Program, performing next-generation tumor profiling to identify novel genetic targets for personalized targeted therapies, and directs the Molecular Tumor Board. Dr. Ford is an editor of numerous scientific journals, including Cancer Research, DNA Repair, and PLoS Genetics. He has recently been named the founding Editor-in-Chief of JCO Precision Oncology. .
    Postdoctoral Medical Fellow, Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Ph.D. Student in Cancer Biology, admitted Summer 2017 Resident in Surgery - General Surgery
    Associate Professor of Biology
    Donald Kennedy Chair in the School of Humanities and Sciences and Professor of Genetics
    Reed-Hodgson Professor in Human Biology and Professor of Genetics and of Obstetrics/Gynecology (Reproductive and Stem Cell Biology)
    The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Pathology and of Microbiology and Immunology

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