Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Translational Oncology Profiles

Showing 11 - 20 of 48
    Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Pediatrics

    Bio

    Dr. Ford is a medical oncologist and geneticist at Stanford, devoted to studying the genetic basis of breast and GI cancer development, treatment and prevention. Dr. Ford graduated in 1984 Magna Cum Laude (Biology) from Yale University where he later received his M.D. degree from the School of Medicine in 1989. He was a internal medicine resident (1989-91), Clinical Fellow in Medical Oncology (1991-94), Research Fellow of Biological Sciences (1993-97) at Stanford, and joined the faculty in 1998. He is currently Professor of Medicine (Oncology) and Genetics, and Director of the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic and the Cancer Genomics Program at the Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Ford’s research goals are to understand the role of genetic changes in cancer genes in the risk and development of common cancers. He studies the role of the p53 and BRCA1 tumor suppressor genes in DNA repair, and uses techniques for high-throughput genomic analyses of cancer to identify molecular signatures for targeted therapies. Dr. Ford’s clinical interests include the diagnosis and treatment of patients with a hereditary pre-disposition to cancer. He runs the Stanford Cancer Genetics Clinic, that sees patients for genetic counseling and testing of hereditary cancer syndromes for prevention and early diagnosis of cancer in high-risk individuals and populations. He has recently been named the Director of Stanford’s new Cancer Genomics Program, performing next-generation tumor profiling to identify novel genetic targets for personalized targeted therapies, and directs the Molecular Tumor Board. Dr. Ford is an editor of numerous scientific journals, including Cancer Research, DNA Repair, and PLoS Genetics. He has recently been named the founding Editor-in-Chief of JCO Precision Oncology. .
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Associate Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Associate Professor of Biochemistry
    Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    I am a brain tumor neurosurgeon, treating patients with malignant and benign tumors, including glioma, brain metastases, meningioma, vestibular schwannoma, and pituitary adenomas. Our lab seeks greater understanding of the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms driving tumorigenesis and disease progression in malignant brain tumors. We currently study the capacity of cellular and cell-free DNA to inform treatment choices in patients with brain tumors. We also use single cell and cell subtype-specific transcriptomics to identify and target infiltrating glioblastoma. We hope to identify potentially targetable genes crucial in tumorigenesis. Our laboratory is a unique and collaborative working environment, engaged in a dynamic research environment at Stanford. Our laboratory space lies at the heart of the Stanford campus between the core campus and the medical facilities, emblematic of the translational aspects of our work. www.gephartlab.com www.GBMseq.org
    Professor of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Holsinger is Professor and Chief of Head and Neck Surgery at Stanford University. His research focuses on surgical innovation and clinical trials through NCI-funded cooperative groups. He serves as surgical principal investigator for RTOG920 and coordinated surgeon-credentialing for ECOG 3311, a prospective clinical trial to study robotic head and neck surgery. He leads an investigative device exemption trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of anext-generation flexible robotic surgical system. In 2014, he began a prospective clinical trial to evaluate multispectral imaging of patients with oropharyngeal cancer, in an effort to discern tumor from tumor. Currently, he leads a study to evaluate hyper-spectral imaging to improve surgical vision. From 2003-2013, Dr. Holsinger worked at the Department of Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center where he founded and led the Program in Minimally Invasive and Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery and co-directed the program in Minimally Invasive Technology in Oncologic Surgery. Dr. Holsinger’s surgical practice focuses on the surgical management of benign and malignant diseases of the thyroid, as well as head and neck cancer. His areas of research interest include endoscopic head and neck surgery, including transoral robotic surgery and transoral laser microsurgery, as well as time-honoured approaches of conservation laryngeal surgery and supracricoid partial laryngectomy. At the Cancer Center, Dr. Holsinger has led an effort to improve the quality of multidisciplinary tumor boards in H&N, but also across the Cancer Center, beginning with the founding of the H&N Multidisciplinary Cancer Care Clinical Program in 2014. Dr. Holsinger received his medical degree from Vanderbilt School of Medicine, completed his internship and residency at Baylor College of Medicine and his Fellowship in head and neck surgical oncology at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. In 2003, he was awarded Fulbright Scholarship to study surgery at the University of Paris with Professor Ollivier Laccourreye and with Professor Wolfgang Steiner at the Georg-August University in Göttingen. Dr. Holsinger has authored or co-authored numerous articles and abstracts, which have appeared in publications such as the New England Journal of Medicine, Journal of the American College of Surgeons, the Journal of Clinical Oncology, Clinical Cancer Research, Head & Neck, Laryngoscope, and the Archives of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery. Board-certified by the American Board of Otolaryngology, Dr. Holsinger is a member of numerous societies including the American College of Surgeons, the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and the American Head and Neck Society.
    John and Marva Warnock Professor

    Bio

    Stefanie Jeffrey, MD, is the John and Marva Warnock Professor and Chief of Surgical Oncology Research in the Department of Surgery at Stanford University School of Medicine. She received her undergraduate degree in Chemistry and Physics and master’s degree in Chemistry from Harvard University. She graduated from medical school at University of California San Francisco (UCSF), where she also completed her surgical residency. Her lab focuses on technology development and applications related to liquid biopsy (CTCs, ctDNA, extracellular vesicles), droplet-based microfluidic platforms, and preclinical models for testing new cancer therapies.
    Dennis Farrey Family Professor in Pediatrics, and Professor of Genetics
    Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Chemistry and, by courtesy, of Biochemistry

    Bio

    Research in this laboratory focuses on problems where deep insights into enzymology and metabolism can be harnessed to improve human health. For the past two decades, we have studied and engineered enzymatic assembly lines called polyketide synthases that catalyze the biosynthesis of structurally complex and medicinally fascinating antibiotics in bacteria. An example of such an assembly line is found in the erythromycin biosynthetic pathway. Our current focus is on understanding the structure and mechanism of this polyketide synthase. At the same time, we are developing methods to decode the vast and growing number of orphan polyketide assembly lines in the sequence databases. For more than a decade, we have also investigated the pathogenesis of celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder of the small intestine, with the goal of discovering therapies and related management tools for this widespread but overlooked disease. Ongoing efforts focus on understanding the pivotal role of transglutaminase 2 in triggering the inflammatory response to dietary gluten in the celiac intestine. Recently, we initiated a collaborative program involving multiple Stanford laboratories (http://med.stanford.edu/virx.html.html) that is aimed at developing a fundamentally new approach to treating viral infections. As part of this initiative, we are developing an antiviral chemotherapy that modulates pyrimidine metabolism in the host, and also a platform to engineer immuno-modulatory glycolipids for the treatment of influenza.
    The George A. and Hilda M. Daubert Professor in Chemistry

    Bio

    Eric Kool received his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Columbia University and did postdoctoral work in nucleic acids chemistry at Caltech. He started his career at the University of Rochester before moving to Stanford in 1999, where he is the George and Hilda Daubert Professor of Chemistry. He teaches Organic Chemistry and Chemical Biology to undergraduate and graduate students. The Kool lab uses the tools of chemistry to study the structures, interactions and biological activities of nucleic acids and the enzymes that process them. Molecular design and synthesis play a major role in this work, followed by analysis of structure and function, both in test tubes and in living systems. These studies are aimed at gaining a better basic understanding of biology, and applying this knowledge to practical applications in biomedicine. As part of this research, members of the group synthesize designer nucleobases and nucleotides, with unusual properties such as fluorescence, enzyme reactivity, or altered shape and H-bonding ability. We use these as tools to study DNA polymerase enzymes, DNA repair pathways, and RNA modifying enzymes. This work is leading to new probes for diagnosis of cancer, useful fluorescent tags for biology, and fluorescent sensors of many species such as cancer metabolites and toxic metals.

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