Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Radiation Biology Profiles

Showing 11 - 20 of 27
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)
    Johnson & Johnson Professor of Surgery and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering
    Dr. Morris Herzstein Professor in Biology, Emeritus
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology

    Bio

    Dr. Susan Knox specializes in the treatment of breast cancer and melanoma, and sees a variety of general radiation oncology patients. She has practiced as a radiation oncologist for more than 25 years. A primary area of research in Dr. Knox’s laboratory is the study of novel therapies (targeted therapies, radiosensitizers, radioprotectors, and biological response modifiers) for the treatment of solid tumors, with a particular focus on prostate cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, using small animal tumor models. Her research is interdisciplinary and spans the study of mechanisms of action at the molecular level to translational studies and early clinical trials. Her drug discovery/development work, and research on innovative therapeutic approaches has resulted in 3 new ongoing clinical trials. A major focus of both her laboratory and clinical research is the use of radiation as a component of in situ tumor vaccine strategies. She has had a long -standing interest in clinical research and has served as a PI on numerous clinical trials and as a member of the Clinical Oncology Study Section. As the Faculty Director of the PRMS for the Stanford Cancer Institute, she oversees the Scientific Review Committee and chairs the Data and Safety Monitoring Committee.
    Katharine Dexter McCormick and Stanley McCormick Memorial Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Quynh-Thu Le, MD received both her medical school and radiation oncology training at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). She then joined the Stanford faculty in 1997. She became the Chair of the Stanford Radiation Oncology Department in September 2011. She also holds the Katharine Dexter McCormick & Stanley Memorial Professorship at Stanford University. Her research focuses on translating laboratory findings to the clinic and vice versa in head and neck cancer (HNC), specifically in the area of tumor hypoxia and salivary gland stem cells. Her research is reflected in both her publications and grant funding. Hers was one of the first groups that identified circulating biomarkers for tumor hypoxia in HNC, leading to the application of some of these markers in clinical trials, testing hypoxia targeted strategies. On the clinical side, she has led multicenter phase II and III clinical trials, testing the addition of novel drugs as either radiosensitizer or radioprotector with chemoradiotherapy in HNC. She has received grant support from the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Education & Development Award, R01 and R21 grants from the National Institute of Health (NIH). She was inducted into the Fellowship of the American College of Radiology (FACR), the American Society of Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (FASTRO) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She’s also received a distinguished alumni award from Caltech. Administratively, she is the Co-Director of the Radiation Biology Program of the Stanford Cancer Institute and the Chair of the Head and Neck Cancer Committee of the NRG Oncology Group, which is part of the NCI supported National Clinical Trial Network (NCTN), running large phase II-III studies for radiation in solid cancers. She serves on the editorial board of the several cancer related journals.
    Associate Professor of Urology and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Nephrology) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Billy W. Loo, Jr., M.D., Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology, a member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) in the Department of Radiology, and a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute, in the School of Medicine. He is a physician-scientist Radiation Oncologist and Bioengineer who leads the Thoracic Radiation Oncology Program at Stanford. His clinical specialties are state-of-the-art radiation therapy for lung/thoracic cancers, including stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) and 4-D image-guided radiation therapy for lung tumors. Dr. Loo is a recognized expert in thoracic cancers serving on multiple national committees (including as writing member, chair, or vice-chair) that publish clinical guidelines on the treatment of lung cancer and other thoracic malignancies, including the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN), American College of Radiology (ACR), and American Society of Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). His clinical research is in clinical trials and implementation of new treatment techniques for lung cancer, development of new medical imaging methods for measuring organ function and predicting response to cancer treatment, and development of next generation radiation treatment technologies and studying their unique biological effects. As part of this work, he leads an active clinical and preclinical research program in molecular imaging, particularly using novel PET tracers for tumor hypoxia (EF5), tumor proliferation (FLT), and neuroinflammation (PBR06). Since conceiving of a fundamentally new approach to delivering ultra-rapid, ultra-precise radiation therapy, pluridirectional high-energy agile scanning electronic radiotherapy (PHASER), Dr. Loo's major laboratory research focus has been to co-lead a collaborative effort between the Stanford Cancer Institute and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to develop PHASER into a transformative yet clinically practical technology. This program comprises both technology development and fundamental research on the radiobiology of extremely rapid FLASH radiation therapy to optimize the biological therapeutic index. Dr. Loo received his MD from University of California, Davis and his PhD in Bioengineering from University of California, San Francisco and Berkeley. He completed his Radiation Oncology residency training at Stanford University. He is certified by the American Board of Radiology in Radiation Oncology.
    Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Maxim is a medical physicist in Radiation Oncology at Stanford University and Biophysicist, whose personal vision is the development of advanced, curative radiation therapy for all types and stages of malignancies, and new indications such as cardiovascular illnesses that will lead to increased survival worldwide from the top cancer and non-cancer causes of mortality. His personal areas of emphasis are stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), four-dimensional computed tomography (4D CT), and the development of novel, and safe radiation therapy that addresses the major technical challenge of accurately and precisely treating moving targets and anatomy. Peter is interested in the management of interdisciplinary, science and technology oriented teams in health care and is actively developing next generation radiotherapy technologies. Peter received his Dipl. Phys. (M.Sc.) from the Technical University, Berlin, Germany his Dr. rer. nat. (PhD) from Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany. He is certified by the American Board of Radiology in Therapeutic Radiologic Physics. He is currently an Assistant Professor of Radiation Oncology at Stanford University.

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