Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Lymphoma & Leukemia Profiles

Showing 11 - 20 of 23
    The Joanne and Peter Haas, Jr., Professor for Cutaneous Lymphoma Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Youn H. Kim, M.D., is a Professor of Dermatology and member of the Stanford Cancer Institute. She is the Director of Stanford's Multidisciplinary Cutaneous Lymphoma Clinic/Program (MCLP). Her current research is dedicated towards strengthening the collaborative interface for novel discoveries and exploring new and improved therapies with tumor-specific targets and enhanced synergy and/or potency. She and her multidisciplinary colleagues are exploring novel immune/cell therapy modalities including in situ vaccination, immune checkpoint blockades, and unique allogeneic HSCT strategies.
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Hematology and Oncology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital
    Robert K. and Helen K. Summy Professor in the School of Medicine
    Lydia J. Lee Professor in Pediatric Cancer
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Hematology)

    Bio

    Dr. Ravi Majeti is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, Chief of the Division of Hematology, and Member of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University. He was an undergraduate at Harvard, earned his MD and PhD from UCSF, and trained in Internal Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. Dr. Majeti completed his Hematology Fellowship at Stanford, and is a board-certified hematologist. While at Stanford, he completed post-doctoral training in the laboratory of Irving Weissman, where he investigated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) stem cells and therapeutic targeting with anti-CD47 antibodies. With Dr. Weissman, he developed a humanized anti-CD47 antibody, initiated first-in-human clinical trials, and in 2015, co-founded Forty Seven Inc. Dr. Majeti established his independent laboratory in 2009 with research focused on the molecular/genomic characterization and therapeutic targeting of leukemia stem cells in human hematologic malignancies, particularly AML. Dr. Majeti is a recipient of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Medical Scientists, the New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Investigator Award, and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar Award.
    George E. Becker Professor in Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology
    Professor of Pathology at Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Natkunam is an expert in the diagnosis of hematopoietic tumors including lymphoma and leukemia, and has over 15-years of experience. As the Director of Hematopathology, she oversees all hematopathology diagnostic services for Stanford Health and Stanford Children’s Health. Her research focuses on refining criteria for the diagnosis of hematopoietic tumors through discovery and application of biomarkers, an approach that has furnished novel reagents and guidelines for clinical practice. She currently serves on the editorial boards of the American Journal of Surgical Pathology and Human Pathology, and on the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and the Lunenburg Lymphoma Biomarker Consortium.
    Rachford and Carlota Harris Professor

    Bio

    Dr. Nolan is the Rachford and Carlota A. Harris Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He trained with Leonard Herzenberg (for his Ph.D.) and Nobelist Dr. David Baltimore (for postdoctoral work for the first cloning/characterization of NF-κB p65/ RelA and the development of rapid retroviral production systems). He has published over 180 research articles and is the holder of 20 US patents, and has been honored as one of the top 25 inventors at Stanford University. Dr. Nolan is the first recipient of the Teal Innovator Award (2012) from the Department of Defense (a $3.3 million grant for advanced studies in ovarian cancer), the first recipient of an FDA BAAA, for “Bio-agent protection” grant, $3million, from the FDA for a “Cross-Species Immune System Reference”, and received the award for “Outstanding Research Achievement in 2011” from the Nature Publishing Group for his development of CyTOF applications in the immune system. Dr. Nolan has new efforts in the study of Ebola, having developed instrument platforms to deploy in the field in Africa to study Ebola samples safely with the need to transport them to overseas labs (funded by a new $3.5 million grant from the FDA). Dr. Nolan is an outspoken proponent of translating public investment in basic research to serve public welfare. Dr. Nolan was the founder of Rigel Inc. (NASDAQ: RIGL), and Nodality, Inc. (a diagnostics development company), BINA (a genomics computational infrastructure company sold to Roche Diagnostics), and serves on the Boards of Directors of several companies as well as consults for other biotechnology companies. DVS Sciences, on which he was Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board, recently sold to Fluidigm for $207 million dollars (2014) on an investment of $14 million. His areas of research include hematopoiesis, cancer and leukemia, autoimmunity and inflammation, and computational approaches for network and systems immunology. Dr. Nolan’s recent efforts are focused on a single cell analysis advance using a mass spectrometry-flow cytometry hybrid device, the so- call “CyTOF” and the “Multiparameter Ion Beam Imager” (MIBI) developed by Dr. Mike Angelo in his lab (Dr. Angelo is now an Assistant Professor in the Dept of Pathology at Stanford). The approaches uses an advanced ion plasma source to determine the levels of tagged reagents bound to cells—enabling a vast increase in the number of parameters that can be measured per cell—either as flow cytometry devices (CyTOF) or imaging platforms for cancer (MIBI). Further efforts are being develop with another imaging platform terms CODEX that inexpensively converts fluorescence scopes to high dimensional imaging platforms. Dr. Nolan’s efforts are to enable a deeper understanding not only of normal immune function, trauma, pathogen infection, and other inflammatory events but also detailed substructures of leukemias and solid cancers—which will enable wholly new understandings that will enable better management of disease and clinical outcomes.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and of Biomedical Data Science
    Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine

    Bio

    Dr. Sakamoto received her B.A. in Biology from Williams College and her M.D. from the University of Cincinnati. She was a pediatric resident and hematology/oncology fellow at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. Dr. Sakamoto was a research fellow at UCLA and then was a faculty member at UCLA in the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Hematology/Oncology for over 20 years. She received her Ph.D. in Biology from the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Sakamoto was the Division Chief of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology at UCLA for six years and was the Vice-Chair of Research in the Department of Pediatrics; co-Associate Director of the Signal Transduction Program Area of the UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, and co-Chair of the UCLA Clinical and Translational Science Institute, Committee for Maternal, Child, and Adolescent Health. From 2011-2014, she was the Division Chief of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant/Cancer Biology at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital at Stanford. Dr. Sakamoto was the Fellowship Program Director and is the P.I. of an NIH T32 training grant at Stanford. Currently, she is a member of the Child Health Research Institute Executive Committee at Stanford University and the Academic Promotion Committee for Stanford School of Medicine. Dr. Sakamoto’s research has focused on signaling pathways and gene regulation in normal and aberrant hematopoiesis, including leukemia and bone marrow failure syndromes. She is specifically interested in targeted therapies for leukemia and other types of pediatric cancers. Dr. Sakamoto has been funded by the National Institutes of Health for over 20 years. She currently holds the Shelagh Galligan Endowed Professorship and has received awards from the American Cancer Society, Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Bear Necessities, and CDMRP(DOD). She has been a standing and ad hoc member of National Institutes of Health grant review committees for the past 15 years. She is Chair of the Bear Necessities Scientific Review Committee. She is currently developing novel therapies to target CREB for the treatment of acute leukemia. Promising small molecule compounds that are effective in the lab and nontoxic will be tested and optimized to take to the clinic for patients with relapsed leukemia. This will provide novel approaches to treat leukemia in children.

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