Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Cancer Stem Cells Profiles

Showing 11 - 20 of 20
    Virginia and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor in Cancer Research
    Professor of Neurosurgery
    Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation)

    Bio

    Dr. Porteus was raised in California and was a local graduate of Gunn High School before completing A.B. degree in “History and Science” at Harvard University where he graduated Magna Cum Laude and wrote an thesis entitled “Safe or Dangerous Chimeras: The recombinant DNA controversy as a conflict between differing socially constructed interpretations of recombinant DNA technology.” He then returned to the area and completed his combined MD, PhD at Stanford Medical School with his PhD focused on understanding the molecular basis of mammalian forebrain development with his PhD thesis entitled “Isolation and Characterization of TES-1/DLX-2: A Novel Homeobox Gene Expressed During Mammalian Forebrain Development.” After completion of his dual degree program, he was an intern and resident in Pediatrics at Boston Children’s Hospital and then completed his Pediatric Hematology/Oncology fellowship in the combined Boston Chidlren’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute program. For his fellowship and post-doctoral research he worked with Dr. David Baltimore at MIT and CalTech where he began his studies in developing homologous recombination as a strategy to correct disease causing mutations in stem cells as definitive and curative therapy for children with genetic diseases of the blood, particularly sickle cell disease. Following his training with Dr. Baltimore, he took an independent faculty position at UT Southwestern in the Departments of Pediatrics and Biochemistry before again returning to Stanford in 2010 as an Associate Professor. During this time his work has been the first to demonstrate that gene correction could be achieved in human cells at frequencies that were high enough to potentially cure patients and is considered one of the pioneers and founders of the field of genome editing—a field that now encompasses thousands of labs and several new companies throughout the world. His research program continues to focus on developing genome editing by homologous recombination as curative therapy for children with genetic diseases but also has interests in the clonal dynamics of heterogeneous populations and the use of genome editing to better understand diseases that affect children including infant leukemias and genetic diseases that affect the muscle. Clinically, Dr. Porteus attends at the Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital where he takes care of pediatric patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
    Lee Otterson Professor in the School of Engineering and Professor of Bioengineering, of Applied Physics and, by courtesy, of Physics

    Bio

    Professor Quake's interests lie at the nexus of physics, biology and biotechnology. His group pioneered the development of Microfluidic Large Scale Integration (mLSI), demonstrating the first integrated microfluidic devices with thousands of mechanical valves. This technology is helping to pave the way for large scale automation of biology at the nanoliter scale, and he and his students have been exploring applications of lab-on-a-chip technology in functional genomics, genetic analysis, and structural biology. Professor Quake is also active in the field of single molecule biophysics.
    Sabine Kohler, MD, Professor in Pathology
    Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research, Professor of Developmental Biology and, by courtesy, of Biology
    Associate Professor of Pathology and, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology

    Bio

    Dr. Wernig is an Associate Professor of Pathology at the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University. He graduated with an M.D. Ph.D. from the Technical University of Munich where he trained in developmental genetics in the lab of Rudi Balling. After completing his residency in Neuropathology and General Pathology at the University of Bonn, he then became a postdoctoral fellow in the lab of Dr. Rudolf Jaenisch at the Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research/ MIT in Cambridge, MA. In 2008, Dr. Wernig joined the faculty of the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at Stanford University where he has been ever since. He received an NIH Pathway to Independence Award, the Cozzarelli Prize for Outstanding Scientific Excellence from the National Academy of Sciences U.S.A., the Outstanding Investigator Award from the International Society for Stem Cell Research, the New York Stem Cell Foundation Robertson Stem Cell Prize, and more recently has been named a HHMI Faculty Scholar. Dr. Wernig’s lab is interested in pluripotent stem cell biology and the molecular determinants of neural cell fate decisions. His laboratory was the first to generate functional neuronal cells reprogrammed directly from skin fibroblasts, which he termed induced neuronal (iN) cells. The lab is now working on identifying the molecular mechanisms underlying induced lineage fate changes, the phenotypic consequences of disease-causing mutations in human neurons and other neural lineages as well as the development of novel therapeutic gene targeting and cell transplantation-based strategies for a variety of monogenetic diseases.
    Professor of Pathology at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Stephen R. Pierce Family Goldman Sachs Professor in Science and Human Health, Professor of Biomedical Data Science

    Bio

    I am a professor at Stanford University with joint appointments in the Department of Statistics and the Department of Biomedical Data Science. My current research interests are Bayesian Statistics, Computational Biology and Precision Medicine.
    Simon H. Stertzer, MD, Professor and Professor of Radiology

    Bio

    Joseph C. Wu, MD, PhD is the Simon H. Stertzer Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Radiology, and the Director of the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute (http://cvi.stanford.edu/). Dr. Wu received his medical degree from Yale. He completed his medicine internship, residency and cardiology fellowship training at UCLA followed by a PhD (Molecular & Medical Pharmacology) in the UCLA STAR program. His clinical activities involve adult congenital heart disease and cardiovascular imaging. Dr. Wu has published >300 manuscripts. His lab works on biological mechanisms of patient-specific and disease-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The main goals are to (i) understand basic cardiovascular disease mechanisms, (ii) accelerate drug discovery and screening, (iii) develop “clinical trial in a dish” concept, and (iv) implement precision cardiovascular medicine for prevention and treatment of patients. His lab uses a combination of genomics, stem cells, cellular & molecular biology, physiological testing, and molecular imaging technologies to better understand molecular and pathophysiological processes. Dr. Wu has received several awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Foundation (BWF) Career Award in Medical Sciences, BWF Innovation in Regulatory Science Award, American Heart Association (AHA) Innovative Research Award, AHA Established Investigator Award, AHA Merit Award, National Institute of Health (NIH) Director’s New Innovator Award, NIH Roadmap Transformative Award, and Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) given out by President Obama. He is on the editorial board of Journal Clinical Investigation, Circulation Research, Circulation Cardiovascular Imaging, JACC Cardiovascular Imaging, Human Gene Therapy, Molecular Therapy, Stem Cell Research, Physiological Genomics, Scientific Reports, Journal of Nuclear Cardiology, and Nature Review Cardiology Dr. Wu is a member of the Association of University Cardiologists (AUC), American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), and Association of American Physicians (AAP). Dr. Wu currently serves on the Scientific Advisory Board for the Keystone Symposia (2014-2020), FDA Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies Advisory Committee (2016-2020), AHA National Board of Directors (2017-2019), and Chair of the AHA Research Committee (2017-2019).

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