Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Cancer Imaging & Early Detection Profiles

Showing 11 - 20 of 39
    Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Clinical Investigation in Cancer Research and Professor, by courtesy, of Bioengineering and of Materials Science and Engineering
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    My research interests encompass the physics and mathematics of imaging with Magnetic Resonance. Presently my research is directed in part towards exploration of rapid MRI scanning methods using spiral and other non-Cartesian k-space trajectories for dynamic imaging of function. Using spiral techniques, we have developed MRI pulse sequences and processing methods for mapping cortical brain function by imaging the metabolic response to various stimuli, with applications in the basic neurosciences as well as for clinical applications. These methods develop differential image contrast from hemodynamically driven increases in oxygen content in the vascular bed of activated cortex, using pulse sequences sensitive to the paramagnetic behavior of deoxyhemoglobin or to the blood flow changes. Other applications include imaging of contrast uptake in the breast.
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Physics) and, by courtesy, of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford)
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
    Associate Professor of Radiology (Nuclear Medicine) at the Stanford University Medical Center

    Bio

    Dr. Iagaru is an Associate Professor of Radiology - Nuclear Medicine and the Chief of the Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging at Stanford Health Care. He completed medical school at Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine in Philadelphia. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. Dr. Iagaru finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. His research interests include PET/MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; peptide-based diagnostic imaging and therapy; and radioimmunotherapy. Since joining the faculty at Stanford in 2007, Dr. Iagaru has received several awards including the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) 2009 Image of the Year Award; American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) Mid-Winter Conference 2010 Best Essay Award; 2009, 2014 and 2015Western Regional SNM Scientist Award; 2011 SNM Nuclear Oncology Council Young Investigator Award; and a Stanford Cancer Center 2009 Developmental Cancer Research Award in Translational Science. Dr. Iagaru presented more than 100 abstracts at national and international meetings and published more than 100 papers in peer-reviewed journals, as well as 7 book chapters.
    Professor of Radiology (General Radiology)
    Professor (Research) of Electrical Engineering

    Bio

    Butrus (Pierre) T. Khuri-Yakub is a Professor of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He received the BS degree from the American University of Beirut, the MS degree from Dartmouth College, and the Ph.D. degree from Stanford University, all in electrical engineering. His current research interests include medical ultrasound imaging and therapy, ultrasound neuro-stimulation, chemical/biological sensors, gas flow and energy flow sensing, micromachined ultrasonic transducers, and ultrasonic fluid ejectors. He has authored over 550 publications and has been principal inventor or co-inventor of 94 US and international issued patents. He was awarded the Medal of the City of Bordeaux in 1983 for his contributions to Nondestructive Evaluation, the Distinguished Advisor Award of the School of Engineering at Stanford University in 1987, the Distinguished Lecturer Award of the IEEE UFFC society in 1999, a Stanford University Outstanding Inventor Award in 2004, Distinguished Alumnus Award of the School of Engineering of the American University of Beirut in 2005, Stanford Biodesign Certificate of Appreciation for commitment to educate, mentor and inspire Biodesgin Fellows, 2011, and 2011 recipient of IEEE Rayleigh award.
    Professor of Radiology (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford/Nuclear Medicine) and, by courtesy, of Physics, of Electrical Engineering and of Bioengineering

    Bio

    Professor Levin's research interests involve the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animals. These new cameras efficiently image radiation emissions in the form of positrons, annihilation photons, gamma rays, and light from molecular probes developed to target molecular signals from deep within tissue of live subjects. The goals of the instrumentation projects are to advance the sensitivity and spatial, spectral, and/or temporal resolutions. The algorithm goals are to understand the physical system comprising the subject tissues, radiation transport, and imaging system, and to provide the best available image quality and quantitative accuracy. The work involves computer modeling, position sensitive sensors, readout electronics, data acquisition, image formation, image processing, and data/image analysis algorithms, and incorporating these innovations into practical imaging devices The ultimate goal is to introduce these new imaging tools into studies of molecular mechanisms and new treatments of disease within living subjects.
    Associate Professor of Urology

    Bio

    Joseph Liao is currently Associate Professor of Urology at Stanford University and Chief of Urology at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System. He earned his A.B. in Biology from Harvard College in 1993 and M.D. from Stanford University School of Medicine in 1997. After completing his urology residency and fellowship in endourology/minimally invasive surgery at UCLA, he joined the Department of Urology at Stanford in 2006, where he is also a member of Bio-X interdisciplinary research program, Stanford Cancer Institute, and Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection. Dr. Liao is a surgeon-scientist who maintains an active clinical practice focusing on minimally invasive surgery and urologic oncology. His laboratory focuses on development and translation of optical molecular imaging for urological cancer and urine-based molecular diagnostics. Dr. Liao has pioneered the application of confocal endomicroscopy in the urinary tract, endoscopic molecular imaging of bladder cancer, an in vitro molecular diagnostics for urinary tract infections and bladder cancer. He has served as the principal investigator on several R01 grants from the National Institutes of Health, as well as a standing member of the NIH Instrument Systems Development study section. He is an author of over 100 manuscripts and the editor of the textbook Advances in Image-Guided Urologic Surgery. He has been an invited speaker to numerous international meetings including the Gordon Research Conferences, IEEE-NANOMED, IEEE-NEMS, SPIE, Society of Urologic Oncology, Endourology Society, American Urological Association, and European Association of Urology.
    Clinical Associate Professor, Radiology

    Bio

    Dr. Lipson is an investigator and faculty member in the Stanford University School of Medicine Department of Radiology, Breast Imaging Division. A graduate of Harvard College in 1995, she received her MD degree from UCSF School of Medicine, prior to completing a preliminary medicine internship year at St. Mary's Medical Center in San Francisco. She went on to complete a diagnostic radiology residency program at UCSF and was ABR board-certified in June 2009. She came to Stanford for a 1 year fellowship program in Breast Imaging in July 2009 before joining the MCL faculty in August 2010. Her clinical work includes screening and diagnostic mammography, diagnostic breast ultrasound, screening and diagnostic breast MRI, and minimally-invasive breast biopsy and wire localization guided by x-ray, ultrasound, and MRI. Her research interests include mammographic density and breast cancer risk assessment; early breast cancer detection and extent of disease evaluation using contrast enhanced mammography and MRI; novel blood and imaging biomarkers of breast cancer burden and neoadjuvant treatment response; and image-guided wireless localization techniques for breast surgery.

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