Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Cancer Biology Profiles

Showing 11 - 20 of 42
    Associate Professor of Genetics and, by courtesy, of Applied Physics

    Bio

    William Greenleaf is an Assistant Professor in the Genetics Department at Stanford University School of Medicine, with a courtesy appointment in the Applied Physics Department. He is a member of Bio-X, the Biophysics Program, the Biomedical Informatics Program, and the Cancer Center. He received an A.B. in physics from Harvard University (summa cum laude) in 2002, and received a Gates Fellowship to study computer science for one year in Trinity College, Cambridge, UK (with distinction). After this experience abroad, he returned to Stanford to carry out his Ph.D. in Applied Physics in the laboratory of Steven Block, where he investigated, at the single molecule level, the chemo-mechanics of RNA polymerase and the folding of RNA transcripts. He conducted postdoctoral work in the laboratory of X. Sunney Xie in the Chemistry and Chemical Biology Department at Harvard University, where he was awarded a Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation Fellowship, and developed new fluorescence-based high-throughput sequencing methodologies. He moved to Stanford as an Assistant Professor in November 2011. Since beginning his lab, he has been named a Rita Allen Foundation Young Scholar, an Ellison Foundation Young Scholar in Aging (declined), a Baxter Foundation Scholar, and a Chan-Zuckerberg Investigator. His highly interdisciplinary research links molecular biology, computer science, bioengineering, and genomics a to understand how the physical state of the human genome controls gene regulation and biological state. Efforts in his lab are split between building new tools to leverage the power of high-throughput sequencing and cutting-edge microscopies, and bringing these new technologies to bear against basic biological questions of genomic and epigenomic variation. His long-term goal is to unlock an understanding of the physical “regulome” — i.e. the factors that control how the genetic information is read into biological instructions — profoundly impacting our understanding of how cells maintain, or fail to maintain, their state in health and disease.
    Professor of Biochemistry and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering and of Chemistry

    Bio

    The overarching goal of the Herschlag Lab is to understand the fundamental behavior of RNA and proteins and, in turn, how these behaviors determine and impact biology more broadly. We are particularly interested in questions of how enzymes work, how RNA folds, how proteins recognize RNA, and the roles of RNA/protein interactions in regulation and control, and the evolution of molecules and molecular interactions. The lab takes an interdisciplinary approach, spanning and integrating physics, chemistry and biology, and employing a wide range of techniques.
    Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)

    Bio

    Dr. Andrew Hoffman is a board certified endocrinologist who specializes in the treatment pituitary and other neuroendocrine diseases, including acromegaly, Cushing syndrome, prolactinomas and other pituitary tumors.
    Professor of Microbiology and Immunology (Baxter Labs) and of Pathology
    Assistant Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and of Developmental Biology

    Bio

    Daniel Jarosz, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Departments of Chemical & Systems Biology and Developmental Biology at Stanford University. He received his B.S. in Chemistry and Biochemistry from the University of Washington and then moved to Massachusetts Institute of Technology for his PhD, where he investigated mechanisms of replication and mutagenesis in the laboratory of Dr. Graham Walker. Following his graduation in 2007, Dr. Jarosz pursued postdoctoral training at the Whitehead Institute with Dr. Susan Lindquist, a pioneer in the field of protein folding. In 2013 Dr. Jarosz established his independent group at Stanford University, where his research is focused on molecular mechanisms that contribute to robustness and evolvability. His work employs multidisciplinary systems approaches ranging from chemical biology to quantitative genetics to understand how these mechanisms contribute to evolution, disease, and development. Dr. Jarosz has received a number of distinctions including being named a Searle Scholar and Kimmel Scholar. He has also received a Science and Engineering Fellowship from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, a Director's New Innovator Award from the NIH, a CAREER award from the NSF, a Pathway to Independence Award from the NIH, and a fellowship from the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation.
    Associate Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
    Carl J. Herzog Professor in Dermatology in the School of Medicine

    Bio

    Dr. Khavari only sees U.S. veteran patients at the VA Palo Alto Healthcare System
    Professor of Biochemistry
    Maureen Lyles D'Ambrogio Professor and Professor, by courtesy, of Chemical and Systems Biology
    Associate Professor of Bioengineering

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