Stanford Cancer Institute Directory

Radiation Biology Profiles

Showing 1 - 10 of 27
    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) and of Genetics
    Professor of Pathology
    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Emeritus
    Associate Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Sue and Bob McCollum Professor
    Professor of Chemical and Systems Biology and, by courtesy, of Chemistry
    Shriram Chair of Bioengineering, Associate Professor of Bioengineering and, by courtesy, of Chemical Engineering

    Bio

    Jennifer Cochran is an associate professor of bioengineering, and has a secondary appointment in chemical engineering. Her research group uses interdisciplinary approaches in chemistry, engineering, and biophysics to study complex biological systems and develop new technologies for basic science and biomedical applications. Professor Cochran's research is driven by the philosophy that in order to effectively control physiological processes it is necessary to understand the molecular mechanisms that drive these processes. Her group is interested in elucidating molecular details of receptor-mediated cell signaling events; at the same time developing protein and peptide-based tools that will allow manipulation of cellular processes on a molecular level. For biomedical applications, rational design and combinatorial methods are used to create designer protein therapeutics and diagnostic agents for applications such as regenerative medicine and cancer imaging and therapy.
    Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Professor, by courtesy, of Surgery

    Bio

    A physician scientist, Dr. Cornfield is actively engaged in clinical medicine, teaching and research. In clinical arena, Dr. Cornfield is a Pediatrician with an active practice in both Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine and Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. In the research arena, Dr. Cornfield's lab addresses several large thematic issues. The areas of concentration include: (i) regulation of pulmonary vascular tone; (ii) oxygen sensing in the lung; (iii) biological determinants of preterm labor focusing on myometrial smooth muscle cells; (iv) developmental regulation of barrier function in the lung; and (v) the role of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 in lung development. In addition, there is an active translational research component.
    Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor, Professor of Radiation Oncology, and by courtesy, of Obstetrics and Gynecology and of Surgery

    Bio

    Professor of Radiation Oncology, Associate Chair for Research & Director of the Division of Radiation & Cancer Biology in the Department of Radiation Oncology. He also is the Director of Basic Science at the Stanford Cancer Institute and heads the Radiation Biology Program in Stanford’s Cancer Center, and is Director of the Cancer Biology Interdisciplinary Graduate Program. He was awarded an American Cancer Society Junior Faculty Research Award and the Michael Fry Award from the Radiation Research Society for his outstanding contributions on understanding the molecular mechanisms of resistance promoted by the tumor microenvironment. Additionally, he was the recipient of the 2013 ASTRO Gold Medal. In 2015, he was awarded an NIH R35 Outstanding Investigator Award and was inducted into the National Academy of Medicine. He co-authored the sixth & seventh editions of the textbook, “Radiation Biology for the Radiologist,” with Professor Eric Hall from Columbia. In addition, he is currently the “Jack, Lulu and Sam Willson Professor in Cancer Biology” in the Stanford University School of Medicine.
    Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Therapy) at the Stanford University Medical Center

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