Stanford Cancer Institute

Translating Stanford discoveries into individualized cancer care

Every day, people living with cancer come to Stanford for help, hope and healing. 

Transforming Cancer Care

Stanford Cancer Initiative is an ambitious program to transform the care experience of every cancer patient treated at Stanford. The Initiative combines the latest research and information management protocols with multi-disciplinary, patient-centered care to improve quality of life and overall health outcomes. Integrating leading-edge research and comprehensive care to dramatically change the prognosis and treatment of cancer.


 

National Cancer Institute Designation

The Stanford Cancer Institute has been designated a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, a part of the National Institutes of Health and the world’s leading cancer research organization.

Designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center signifies that the Stanford Cancer Institute maintains the highest level of scientific rigor, institutional support and coordination for the complete range of cancer-related research, including basic, translational, clinical and population-based science. The designation is recognition of the institute’s robust and integrated programs encompassing laboratory research, clinical care and community outreach and education.

The Institute’s mission is to support and coordinate the wide range of cancer-related activities — in basic, translational, clinical and population-based science — occurring at Stanford University, Stanford Health Care and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, along with its partner institution, the Cancer Prevention Institute of California. Its nearly 400 members include scientists and physicians from a wide range of disciplines, all collaborating to translate research advances into improved cancer treatments.

News & Publications

  • More chemo drugs don’t improve treatment of rare bone cancer

    Osteosarcoma patients with tumors that haven’t responded well to the standard chemotherapy regimen have unimproved outcomes and more side effects when given two additional drugs, a large international trial has found.


  • An emerging view of evolution is informing cancer research

    Cancer cells can be as cooperative as a flock of birds, making individual decisions yet somehow acting in unison. A Stanford researcher is using this insight to make a computer model of cancer.


  • Computers trounce pathologists in predicting lung cancer type, severity

    Automating the analysis of slides of lung cancer tissue samples increases the accuracy of tumor classification and patient prognoses, according to a new study.