Stanford Cancer Institute

Translating Stanford discoveries into individualized cancer care

Every day, people living with cancer come to Stanford for help, hope and healing. 

Transforming Cancer Care

Stanford Cancer Initiative is an ambitious program to transform the care experience of every cancer patient treated at Stanford. The Initiative combines the latest research and information management protocols with multi-disciplinary, patient-centered care to improve quality of life and overall health outcomes. Integrating leading-edge research and comprehensive care to dramatically change the prognosis and treatment of cancer.


National Cancer Institute Designation

The Stanford Cancer Institute has been designated a Comprehensive Cancer Center by the National Cancer Institute, a part of the National Institutes of Health and the world’s leading cancer research organization.

Designation as a Comprehensive Cancer Center signifies that the Stanford Cancer Institute maintains the highest level of scientific rigor, institutional support and coordination for the complete range of cancer-related research, including basic, translational, clinical and population-based science. The designation is recognition of the institute’s robust and integrated programs encompassing laboratory research, clinical care and community outreach and education.

The Institute’s mission is to support and coordinate the wide range of cancer-related activities — in basic, translational, clinical and population-based science — occurring at Stanford University, Stanford Health Care and Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, along with its partner institution, the Cancer Prevention Institute of California. Its nearly 400 members include scientists and physicians from a wide range of disciplines, all collaborating to translate research advances into improved cancer treatments.

  • Stanford Medicine, VA will collaborate to build nation’s first hadron therapy center

    Hadron therapy, which relies on beams of charged particles including protons and heavier ions such as carbon, is expected to increase cancer cure rates because it can be used to treat larger tumors or those resistant to conventional radiotherapy.

  • Common prostate cancer treatment linked to later dementia, researcher says

    A new retrospective study of the health records of prostate cancer patients supports an association between androgen deprivation therapy and future risk of dementia.

  • Iron nanoparticles make immune cells attack cancer

    Stanford researchers accidentally discovered that iron nanoparticles invented for anemia treatment have another use: triggering the immune system’s ability to destroy tumor cells.