Affiliates

Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences)

Bio

Dr. Carolyn Rodriguez utilizes her training as a psychiatrist, neuroscientist, and clinical researcher to innovate rapid-acting treatments to relieve the suffering of patients with severe mental illnesses, including Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). She has led landmark clinical trials that pioneered new targeted treatments and investigated the role of glutamatergic and opioid pathways. As the Director of the Translational Therapeutics Lab and Associate Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, she developed methods that combine in vivo drug infusions with magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalograpy (EEG) to map human brain circuit dysfunction in real time. Carolyn is currently engaged in NIH, foundation, and donor funded mechanistic and clinical efficacy studies of glutamate-modulating compounds, non-invasive brain stimulation, and psychotherapy in OCD. Additional studies focus on understanding the brain mechanisms involved in hoarding disorder and how hording behaviors differ from normal collecting. Carolyn also provides mental health care for Veterans as a Consultation-Liaison psychiatrist at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs. Carolyn serves as Associate Chair for Inclusion and Diversity in the Department of Psychiatry at Stanford, Deputy Editor of The American Journal of Psychiatry, Vice Chair for the Research Council of the American Psychiatric Association, and Co-Chair of the International OCD Foundation Research Symposium. She has won several national awards, including the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). The PECASE recognizes investigators who are pursuing bold and innovative projects at the early stages of their careers and is considered one of the highest honors in scientific research. Carolyn's research has been highlighted by organizations including NPR, PBS, New York Times, ABC News, NBC News, Newsweek, and Time.com. To educate the public on research findings and resources for clinical care, Carolyn contributes articles to Harvard Business Review and Huffington Post. Carolyn received her B.S. in Computer Science from Harvard University in 1996, followed by a Ph.D. in Neuroscience and Genetics from Harvard Medical School and an M.D. from Harvard Medical School-M.I.T. in 2004. Born in San Juan, Puerto Rico, she now lives with her husband and 3 children in Palo Alto.
Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University Medical Center

Bio

Casey H. Halpern, MD, is Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery and, by courtesy, of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, and Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University Medical Center. Dr. Halpern received his medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He completed his residency in Neurological Surgery and a fellowship in Stereotactic and Functional Neurosurgery at the University of Pennsylvania. He focuses on the surgical treatment of movement disorders and epilepsy and has particular interest in minimally invasive surgical approaches, as well as neurostimulation procedures. Surgical focus: Deep brain stimulation Laser ablation Movement disorder surgery Voice tremor Epilepsy surgery Psychiatric disease Chronic pain Cancer-derived pain Trigeminal neuralgia Hemifacial spasm
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology - Adult) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
Instructor, Neurology & Neurological Sciences
Professor of Radiology (Radiological Sciences Lab) and, by courtesy, of Psychology and of Electrical Engineering

Bio

My research interests encompass the physics and mathematics of imaging with Magnetic Resonance (MR). My research is directed in part towards exploration of rapid MRI scanning methods using spiral and other non-Cartesian k-space trajectories for dynamic imaging of function. Using spiral techniques, we have developed MRI pulse sequences and processing methods for mapping cortical brain function by imaging the metabolic response to various stimuli, with applications in the basic neurosciences as well as for clinical applications. These methods develop differential image contrast from hemodynamically driven increases in oxygen content in the vascular bed of activated cortex (Blood Oxygen Level Dependent, or BOLD contrast), using pulse sequences sensitive to the paramagnetic behavior of deoxyhemoglobin or to the blood flow changes. Other interests include multimodal imaging using fMRI in conjunction with EEG, fPET, fNIRS, and neuromodulation with tDCS, tACS, TMS and HiFU. Investigating viscoelasticity of human brain using MR Elastography is of interest as an alternative to BOLD contrast for depicting brain activation.
Clinical Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Clinical Associate Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Bio

Dr. Jennifer Keller is a clinical psychologist who specializes in the assessment of psychiatric conditions. She conducts evaluations for adults on a wide-variety of conditions, including attention deficits (ADHD), cognitive and memory changes or impairments, mood and anxiety disorders, thought disorders, and effects of trauma. She has practiced as a psychologist for more than 15 years. Dr. Keller has a special interest in working with women with interpersonal trauma.
Casual - Non-Exempt, Anesthesia Staff, Anesthesia - Anesthesia Group C

Bio

Kristen H. Scherrer is a postdoctoral fellow in the Stanford Systems Neuroscience and Pain Lab (SNAPL) under the mentorship of Dr. Sean Mackey. She completed her PhD in Experimental Psychology at the University of Mississippi in Dr. Kenneth Sufka’s laboratory, where her research focused on developing and utilizing translational models to examine neuropsychiatric disorders. During her postdoctoral training at the Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies and the University of Florida in Dr. Jay McLaughlin’s laboratory, she broadened her research interests to include pain and substance abuse. Currently, her primary research interest is using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine pain mechanisms, including the specific brain regions that contribute to the affective component of pain, and to develop innovative approaches to treat chronic pain patients. In addition, Kristen is an affiliate of the Brain Stimulation Lab (BSL) in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences under the mentorship of Dr. Nolan Williams.
Clinical Assistant Professor, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Assistant Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry) at the Stanford University Medical Center
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Major Laboratories and Clinical Translational Neurosciences Incubator)

Bio

Dr. Williams is the founding Director of the PanLab for Precision Psychiatry and Translational Neuroscience. She has developed a radical new way to understand and treat mental disorders, anchored in a neuroscience-informed model for precision mental health. In 2018, Dr. Williams launched as founding Director Stanford's Center for Precision Mental Health and Wellness. The Center connects researchers across the campus to advance high definition imaging biotypes for mental health, sensor technology, machine learning approaches, targeted therapeutics and the world's first biotype-guided trials. Dr. Williams also leads department-wide initiatives in precision mental health as Associate Chair of Translational Neuroscience. She has a joint position at the Palo Alto VA Mental Illness Research, Education and Clinical Center where she is Director of education and dissemination. After first graduating Dr. Williams worked with patients experiencing serious mental disorders and who had been hospitalized for many years. This experience transformed the trajectory of her career. She went on to complete her PhD in 1996 with a British Council scholarship for study at Oxford University. She joined the Stanford faculty as a Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in 2013. Prior to this time, she was foundation Professor of Cognitive Neuropsychiatry at the Sydney Medical School and Director of the interdisciplinary Sydney Brain Dynamics Center for 12 years. Her translational programs integrate advanced neuroimaging, technology and digital innovation to transform the way we detect mental disorders, predict mental states, tailor interventions and promote wellness. Data-driven computational approaches are used to refine this transformative approach. Her experience is that a neuroscience-informed model empowers each person with an understanding of their own brain function and can reduce stigma. Her research forms the foundation of the first patented taxonomy for depression and anxiety that quantifies brain circuits for diagnostic precision and prediction. She has contributed over 270 scientific papers to the field.
Assistant Professor (Research) of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Interdisciplinary Brain Science Research)

Bio

I am a computational neuroscientist and currently focus on understanding brain dynamics at rest as well as during learning. The overarching goal of my research is to develop reliable computational methods that will allow for characterizing and modeling temporal dynamics of brain activity, without averaging data in either space or time. I firmly believe that the spatiotemporal richness in brain activity might hold the key to finding the person- and disorder-centric biomarkers. Funded by a career development award (K99/R00; NIMH) and a young investigator award (NARSAD; Brain & Behavior Foundation), I am currently developing methods to model the temporal dynamics of brain activity in individuals with fragile X syndrome and healthy controls. The application of computational modeling to neuroscience and psychiatry is nascent in its development but holds significant promise to affect public health positively. I have a strong interdisciplinary background in (1) computational sciences, (2) neuroscience as well as (3) psychiatry. Integrating neuroscience, psychiatry, and mathematical modeling represents the new frontier in applications and analysis of large neuroimaging datasets and has the potential to revolutionize our understanding of dynamical brain organization in healthy controls and individuals with psychiatric disorders.
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Child Development) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital

Bio

Dr. Singh is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Director of the Pediatric Mood Disorders Program in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Stanford. Her time is divided among the clinical, research, and teaching missions of department. She directs Stanford’s Pediatric Mood Disorders Program, which is an integrated multidisciplinary clinic that aims to treat youth with a spectrum of mood disorders along a developmental continuum. She leads a team of child and adolescent psychiatrists, psychologists, child and adolescent psychiatry fellows, clinical and research postdoctoral fellows, residents, medical students, and research coordinators. Her research focuses on investigating the origins and pathways for developing mood disorders during childhood, as well as methods to protect and preserve function before and after the onset of early mood problems. Dr. Singh’s research team (Pediatric Emotion And Resilience Lab) conducts innovative research examining the neural, cognitive, and genetic underpinnings of pediatric mood disorders. She has extensive experience with multi-level investigations involving children and families, as well as clinical, neuroimaging, and dimensionally-based behavioral assessments. She completed her NIMH career development award that characterizes emotion regulation in healthy offspring of parents with bipolar disorder, and has been leading three independent NIMH funded studies examining the mechanisms of mood and other psychiatric disorders and their treatments among youth. She is extensively involved in collaborations aimed to investigate methods of treating problems associated with and leading up to mood disorders in youth. Specifically, she is examining the benefits of family focused psychotherapy, mindfulness meditation, and medications in youth with or at risk for mood disorders to reduce mood symptoms and family stress. She has also been reviewing the neural effects of medication and psychotherapy in youth. These areas of research hold considerable promise to impact our understanding of the core mechanisms and early interventions for pediatric onset mood disorders.
Associate Professor of Neurology and, by courtesy, of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (General Psychiatry and Psychology-Adult)
Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences (Public Mental Health and Population Sciences) at the Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care System
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