SCBE in the News 2019

December

Inside Stanford Medicine, 12/16/19

--Clarity, honesty matter most in critical care talks with patients

High-stakes conversations with patients and families about critical issues call for doctors to consider how their words are interpreted, Stanford researchers and experts say. Loren Sacks, clinical assistant professor of pediatrics; Marcos Mills, a pediatric cardiology fellow; David Magnus; the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine; Barbara Sourkes; professor of pediatrics; Rev. Diana Brady; Marina Persoglia Bell, interpreter services manager for the children’s hospital; fourth-year medical student Jacob Blythe; and Anne Dubin, professor of pediatrics, are quoted in this story.

Washington Post, 12/13/19

--A Harvard scientist is developing a DNA-based dating app to reduce genetic disease. Critics called it eugenics.

Mildred Cho, professor of pediatrics and associate director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, provides comment on perceptions of genetic technology.

Scope, 12/05/19

--Close calls: How AI could improve breast tumor diagnosis

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Ross Shachter, associate professor of management science and engineering, discussed how AI can help radiologists with diagnosis accuracy. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host.

Scope, 12/03/19

--Discussing death: Teaching clinicians how to broach tough topics with patients

In this series, three Stanford physicians discuss how Stanford Medicine medical students are learning to navigate difficult conversations. Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine; Charles Prober, senior associate vice provost for health education, and professor of pediatrics and of microbiology and immunology; and Jonathan Berek, the Laurie Kraus Lacob professor of obstetrics and gynecology, are featured in this post.

 

November

Medscape, 11/27/19

--Mindsets can make the difference in clinical medicine

Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, and director of Presence, is joined by Alia Crum, assistant professor of psychology, as they discuss the impact of mindsets in clinical medicine in this podcast.

Wall Street Journal, 11/22/19

--Your health data isn’t as safe as you think

This piece examines the conflict between health-privacy regulations and rapidly evolving technology. Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, provides comment.

Medscape, 11/19/19

--Male clinicians miss microaggressions their female peers notice

Men underestimate how often women experience microaggressions in clinic and hospital settings. Arghavan Salles, a scholar in residence, and VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of the Successful Aging Program, are quoted in this article.

Yahoo.com, 11/18/19

--People aged 110 and older have ‘unique’ immune cells that may help them live longer, says study

A new study reveals that supercentenarians, people aged 110 years and older, have significantly higher numbers of a rare type T cell in their blood, making for a stronger immune system. VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of the Successful Aging Program, explains how the cells may help them live longer.

DarkDaily.com, 11/18/19

--Could biases in artificial intelligence databases present health risks to patients and financial risks to healthcare providers, including medical laboratories?

Artificial intelligence can be helpful, but physicians and scientists should carefully consider ethical issues related to its use. Danton Char, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, is quoted in this article.

Inside Stanford Medicine (online), 11/13/19

--Videos to educate lawyers on interviewing migrant kids at border

Stanford experts have created four short videos to help lawyers at the U.S. border learn to sensitively interview migrant children and teens about traumatic experiences. Paul Wise, professor of pediatrics and one of the project’s leaders; Maya Adam, director of health education outreach for the Stanford Center for Health Education; and Ryan Matlow, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, are mentioned in this article.

Scope, 11/05/19

--The slow medicine of literature: Scope@10,000

Jacqueline Genovese, executive director of the Medicine & the Muse Program, reflects on a dinner and discussion series called LitMed that lets Stanford physicians experience the "slow medicine of literature."

Imperial College London, 11/04/19

--Interview: Abraham Verghese on transforming medical education

In this Q&A, Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, shares his thoughts on medical education and the importance of the ‘human touch’ in doctor-patient relationships.

 

October

Well (New York Times), 10/31/19

--A gender divide on microaggressions in medicine

In this piece, VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of palliative care education and training, discusses her recent study that found that women at medical schools reported that microaggressions were common in their workplaces, but their male colleagues did not. The work is also covered on Scope.

Scope, 10/28/19

--Health care remixed: ZDoggMD presents at Stanford

Zubin Damania, aka ZDoggMD, discussed the importance of connecting with patients at Stanford's 29th annual Jonathan J. King Lecture. Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, welcomed the audience to the event, which was sponsored by Stanford's Center for Biomedical Ethics.

Wall Street Journal, 10/14/19

--The ethical dilemmas AI poses for health care

This piece explores both the promises and concerns related to artificial intelligence in medicine. Danton Char, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, is quoted.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 10/05/19

--Improving Air Quality While Reducing Your Carbon Footprint

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Sharon Chinthrajah, clinical associate professor of pediatrics and of medicine and director of the clinical translational research unit at Stanford’s Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research, discussed ways to protect your health from air pollution while decreasing energy consumption. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host.

California Healthline, 10/04/19

--Federally funded Obria prescribes abstinence to stop the spread of STDs

Obria, a Christian medical chain, was awarded federal family planning funds for its California clinics for the first time this year. Clinics receiving Title X funds are expected to treat and prevent sexually transmitted diseases. This Kaiser Health News piece discusses how the group’s prohibition against condoms means its prevention efforts rest on abstinence, even as STD rates surge. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, is quoted here.

Medscape, 10/04/19

--Medicine and the Machine, A Podcast: It's Time for Phyicians to Organize -- For Our Patients' Sake

In this Q&A and accompanying podcast, Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, discusses the importance of why doctors should organize and prioritize time with patients.

Shots (NPR), 10/01/19

--'Tantalizing' results for a test of vitamin C for sepsis

This piece discusses confounding study results for the use of vitamin C to treat sepsis. Steven Goodman, professor of medicine and of health research & policy, associate dean of clinical and translational research, and co-director of the Meta-Research Innovation Center at Stanford, provides comment in this piece.

 

September

Scope, 09/27/19

--Medicine and the Muse teams up with Sorbonne Université in Paris

A team from Stanford's Medicine and the Muse were special guests at the Sorbonne for a collaboration exploring empathy and emotion in clinical encounters. In this post, Jacqueline Genovese, executive director of the program, shares highlights from the conference. Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and director of the Stanford Medicine & the Muse program; Alyssa Burgart, clinical assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, are mentioned here. 

Scope, 09/25/19

--Medical device safety in the real world: Tapping EHR data

Researchers at Stanford are mining millions of de-identified patient records using machine learning to determine long-term safety of medical devices. Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, is senior author, and research scientists Alison Callahan, and Jason Fries, are co-lead authors.

Scope, 09/20/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: How to thrive with heart failure

In the final installment of the Demystifying Heart Failure series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and graduate student Min Joo Kim explain how heart failure can be treated and managed.

WIRED, 09/19/19

--AI could reinvent medicine—or become a patient's nightmare

The Mayo Clinic will store health data in Google's cloud and use its AI expertise to unearth insights. Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, provides comment.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 09/07/19

--The Ethics and Impacts of Biohacking on Medical Science and Biology with guest Mildred Cho

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Mildred Cho, professor of pediatrics and associate director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, discussed the ethics and practices of biohacking and its impacts on consumers. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host.

SCOPE, 09/17/19

--Scope@10,000: Why I am a LGBTQ ally

I'm an ally, not only because it's the right thing to do and because I admire the amazing students, faculty, staff, patients and community members who align themselves with Pride. But I am also an ally to honor the memory of the gay men who filled my childhood with light, with love, and with laughter.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 09/07/19

--Algorithms that Enhance the Accuracy of Cancer Prognosis with guest Ash Alizadeh

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Ash Alizadeh, associate professor of medicine, discusses how integrating information over time could improve cancer diagnoses and treatment. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host.

Scope, 09/12/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: Medications as a key part of treatment

In this seventh post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and graduate student Min Joo Kim, outline key medications for heart failure.

Scope, 09/11/19

--“For the times when we don’t know the answers”: Stanford debuts digital consult service

This post highlights a story in the new issue of Stanford Medicine magazine describing how researchers here have created the ultimate consult, pulling from millions of de-identified patient records to better inform the health of others. Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, and Robert Harrington, the Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor and chair of the Department of Medicine, are quoted here.

KGO-TV, 09/09/19

--New Stanford Hospital prepares to open

Preparations are well underway for the opening of the new Stanford Hospital with medical staff going through dress rehearsals for patient care. Helen Wilmot, vice president of facilities services and planning; Ann Weinacker, associate chief medical officer-patient care services; and Ruth Fanning, clinical professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, were featured in this segment.

Scope, 09/05/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: Exercise is A-OK

In this post, the sixth in the series, graduate student Min Joo Kim, along with Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, examine the benefits of activity for heart failure patients and provide some suggestions for exercising safely.

 

August

Scope, 08/29/19

--Demistifying Heart Failure: Why does it develop?

In the fifth installment in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, graduate student Min Joo Kim, along with Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, provide dietary guidance for those with heart failure as well as for those hoping to prevent it.

Hastings Center Report, 08/28/19

--Hastings Partners on Unprecedented Genetics Resource Hub

The Hastings Center is a collaborator on a major new federally funded center that will fill a void in genetics research by collecting and sharing information about its ethical, legal, and social implications. This online genetics resource hub, the first of its kind, will enable people grappling with these issues to easily find ethical or policy guidance or published research, and to connect with experts who can help them.

Scope, 08/22/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: Why does it develop?

In the fourth post in the Demystifying Heart Failure series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and colleagues explain why the condition develops.

Inside Stanford Medicine (online), 08/19/19

--Stanford to lead development of coordinating hub for biomedical ethics

The Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics (SCBE) has been chosen by the National Human Genome Research Institute to help lead the development of a coordinating hub for information on the ethical, legal and social implications of genetic research. The effort will be co-led by Mildred Cho, professor of pediatrics and of medicine and associate director of the SCBE.

Inside Stanford Medicine, 08/19/19

--Researchers building glove to treat symptoms of stroke

A glove being developed by Stanford researchers aims to treat symptoms of stroke through vibration. Postdoctoral scholar Caitlyn Seim is working with Maarten Lansberg, associate professor of neurology, and Allison Okamura, professor of mechanical engineering.

Scope, 08/14/19

--The health of your microbiome: A radio show

In a recent Stanford Radio show hosted by Russ Altman, Ami Bhatt, assistant professor of medicine and genetics, discussed the role of diet and lifestyle play in a healthy microbiome. Atlman is the Kenneth Fong Professor and a professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science.

Scope, 08/14/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: Understanding the different types

In this third installment of the Demystifying Heart Failure series, Min Joo Kim, graduate student, and Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, examine heart failure, explain two primary types of heart failure and introduce Mr. F, a heart failure patient.

Scope, 08/13/19

--Celebrating 10,000 posts! 

Stanford Medicine's blog Scope marked a major milestone today: its 10,000th post. A celebratory series featuring leading writers and physicians, including Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, is planned. 

Scope, 08/08/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: Clearing up misconceptions

In this second installment in the "Demystifying Heart Failure" series, graduate student Min Joo Kim, along with Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, clarify common myths about heart failure. Fatima Rodriguez, assistant professor of medicine, also contributed to the series. 

Scope, 08/05/19

--Discussing death: A palliative care specialist on the importance of talking about priorities

In the second installment of "Discussing death" series, Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, shares insights from the field of palliative care.

Scope, 08/01/19

--Demystifying Heart Failure: A treatable chronic disease

This post is the first in a series examining heart failure written by Min Joo Kim, graduate student, and Randall Stafford.

 

July

Scope, 07/31/19

--Aspirin for prevention: Should you take it?

In this final piece of the series "Aspirin for prevention," Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, explains factors for doctors and patients to consider.

Scope, 07/30/19

--Stanford faculty reminisce about their college summers

Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and director of the Stanford Medicine & the Muse program, and Mary Hawn, the Stanford Medicine Professor and chair of surgery, shared experiences from their memorable college summers with Stanford News.

LIFE (Huffington Post), 07/29/19

--How to take care of yourself when your parent is dying

This article provides tips for practicing self care while being a caregiver for a parent with a terminal diagnosis. VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of palliative care education and training, is quoted here.

Scope, 07/26/19

--A look at the latest food allergy research

In a recent Stanford radio show hosted by Russ Altman, food allergy expert Kari Nadeau, the Naddisy Foundation Professor of Pediatric Food Allergy, Immunology and Asthma, professor of medicine and of pediatrics, and director of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy & Asthma Research at Stanford, explains the latest research on predicting, preventing and treating allergies. Altman is the Kenneth Fong Professor and a professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science.

Scope, 07/25/19

--Multispecialty practices can cut costs among Medicare patients with chronic conditions

New Stanford research has found that larger practices with several specialities have the potential to reduce the cost of care for Medicare patients. Laurence Baker, professor and chair of health research and policy, and Kate Bundorf, associate professor of health research and policy, and senior fellow at the Stanford institute for economic policy research, are quoted in this post.

Scope, 07/24/19

--Aspirin for prevention: Know your risk of heart attack or stroke

In this installment of the series "Aspirin for prevention," Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, provides tips to calculate the risk of heart disease or stroke, to inform decisions about taking aspirin preventatively.

Scope, 07/17/19

--Aspirin for prevention: A look at the potential benefits and risks

This is the first in a series of three revised blog posts on aspirin for prevention. It clarifies the potential benefits and harms of aspirin use. Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, is author of this post.

--Take Two, KPCC, 07/09/19

Fertility Mix-up

A new lawsuit is accusing a fertility center in Los Angeles of an epic mix-up. The suit alleges a patient at the CHA Fertility Center —a woman from New York —carried and then gave birth to twin boys unrelated to her OR each other. And today, the plot thickened when the parents of one of the baby boys, a couple from Glendale, announced a separate lawsuit against the clinic. So how does something like this happen? And what regulations are in place to prevent it? Dr. Alyssa Burgart, Co-Chair of the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital Ethics Committee and is a member of the Stanford Health Care Ethics Committee provides comment - segment starts at 41:45.

Scope, 07/05/19

--New hope for treating childhood brain cancer

In a segment on Stanford Radio, Michelle Monje, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, discussed immunotherapy as a promising new approach to the treatment of brain cancer in children. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, is host.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 07/01/19

--New Treatments & Screening Methods for Tracking Breast Cancer Risks in Women w/ Sylvia Plevritis

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Sylvia Plevritis, professor of radiology and biomedical data science, discussed advances in breast cancer screening and treatment on mortality rates. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host.

Scope, 07/01/19

--Rethinking aspirin for prevention: New studies suggest more limited use

In this blog post, Shreya Shah, clinical assistant professor of medicine in primary care and population health, highlights the new studies on aspirin use and provides a practical approach to the use of the drug for primary prevention. Kim Chiang, clinical assistant professor of medicine in primary care and population health; and Randall Stafford, is a professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, are also mentioned here.


June

Healthline, 06/27/19

--At what age should kids be making their own medical decisions?

Alyssa Burgart, clinical assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, member of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and medical director of clinical ethics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford, provides comment in this article exploring what the appropriate age is for children to make their own medical decisions.

Medscape, 06/26/19

--Medicine and the Machine: A Podcast

Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, and director of Presence, discusses the intersection of artificial intelligence with the practice of medicine.

Scope, 06/24/19

--Designing the new Stanford Hospital for patients and caregivers

The designers of the new Stanford Hospital harnessed the powers of nature, light, art and quiet to transform the patient experience. Ann Weinacker, professor of medicine and senior vice chair of medicine for clinical affairs and associate chief medical officer for patient care services at Stanford Health Care, is quoted in this post.

Scope, 06/20/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Anxiety, addiction and chronic illness

In the final post in the series, Taking Depression Seriously, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao explain how depression often occurs with other conditions such as anxiety, addiction or chronic illnesses.

Scope, 06/13/19

--Learning the risk of genetic disease through Humanwide

This post highlights the third video in the Humanwide series featuring Jayasree, a 39-year-old patient enrolled in the Stanford Medicine pilot project, who sought testing to determine whether she carried a gene that would heighten her risk for breast and ovarian cancer. Megan Mahoney, clinical professor of medicine and chief of general primary care, and Kelly Ormond, professor of genetics, are featured.

TIME.com, 06/13/19

--'They’re chipping away.' Inside the grassroots effort to fight mandatory vaccines

Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is quoted in this piece on the anti-vaccine movement.

Scope, 06/13/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Why healthy living matters

In the seventh post in the series Taking Depression Seriously, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao outline how healthy behaviors can lessen symptoms.

USA Today, 06/12/19

--Fentanyl overdose deaths: Why was this doctor allowed to study and practice medicine?

This op-ed, co-written by Alyssa Burgart argues that applicants with serious criminal histories should not be admitted to medical school. Burgart is clinical assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain, member of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and medical director of clinical ethics at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital Stanford.

Forum (KQED), 06/07/19

--Trump Administration Pulls Funding for Research Using Fetal Tissue

The Department of Health and Human Services announced last week that it will no longer fund any research involving human fetal tissue conducted by in-house scientists at the National Institutes of Health. This segment discussed the politics and ideology behind the move and what the change means for medical research. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, was interviewed.

Scope, 06/06/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Selecting a mental health care provider

In the sixth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao clarify the different types of care providers.

VICE News, HBO, 06/04/19

--Opioids In Court & War Crime Prisoner

Drugmaker Johnson & Johnson appeared in court for the first time to defend itself against an Oklahoma lawsuit that accuses it of fueling the opioid epidemic. Marking the first real test of whether Big Pharma can be held liable for the opioid crisis. Alyssa Burgart, MD, MA provides comment. The segment starts at minute 10:31.

New York Times, 06/06/19

--Putting the glam in mammogram

Clinics are trying to improve the mammogram experience to get women to show up for regular appointments. Laurence Baker, professor and chair of health research and policy, is quoted in this article.

Scope, 06/04/19

--Pharmacogenomics syncs medications with an individual’s genetics through Humanwide

Through the Humanwide project, a patient's pharmacogenomic evaluation helped doctors prescribe a pain reliever that is effective for her individual biology. This post highlights the second video in the Humanwide series which features Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science.

 

May

Scope, 05/30/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Types of talk therapy

In the fourth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao outline the different types of talk therapy.

Scope, 05/23/19

--Cystic fibrosis took Mallory Smith’s life, but her memoir lives on

Mallory Smith's posthumous memoir, Salt in My Soul, An Unfinished Life, chronicles her life with cystic fibrosis. Christy Hartman, senior producer with the Stanford Storytelling Project, knew Mallory and attended a campus event celebrating Mallory's book. David Cornfield, the Anne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in Pediatric Pulmonary Medicine, was Mallory’s physician and is quoted here.

Scope, 05/23/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Understanding medications

In the fourth post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and graduate student Sophia Xiao clarify different types of medications for depression.

Forbes.com, 05/17/19

--Price transparency: Why are drug prices such a bitter pill to swallow?

Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is quoted in this piece on rising drug costs.

Scope, 05/16/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: A treatment overview

In the third post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao address the treatments available for depression.

Stanford Medicine News, 05/14/19

--Can Precision Health transform primary care? Look to Stanford’s Humanwide pilot

In this LinkedIn post, Dean Lloyd Minor explores the promise of Precision Health through Humanwide, a Stanford Medicine pilot program using a data-driven, integrated team approach to predict and prevent disease. A paper outlining initial learnings from the program is also highlighted in a Stanford Medicine press release that quotes Minor; authors Megan Mahoney, clinical professor of medicine and chief of general primary care, and Steven Asch, professor of medicine and vice chief of primary care and population health; and David Entwistle, president and CEO of Stanford Health Care.

Sacramento Bee, 05/13/19

--Vaccine opponents tap social media to fight new California exemptions bill

Senate Bill 276 would require public health officials to approve exceptions to vaccination requirements. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the  Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine, provides comment.

Scope, 05/08/19

--Taking Depression Seriously: Breaking down barriers to care

In this second post in the Taking Depression Seriously series, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao, examine barriers to accessing mental health care.

Next Avenue, 05/08/19

--Resources for your next doctor appointment

VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of palliative care education and training, shares her advice on getting the best care possible.

Scope, 05/02/19

--Taking depression seriously: What is it?

This piece is the first in a series called Taking Depression Seriously, which aims to help patients and family members better understand depression as a chronic disease and more successfully navigate the health care system. Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, and master’s student Sophia Xiao, provide insight on depression in this post.

 

April

Shots (NPR), 04/30/19

--As artificial intelligence moves into medicine, the human touch could be a casualty

As artificial intelligence becomes more broadly used in medicine, it remains important to value equity and inclusion in health care.  Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor, vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine, and director of Presence; Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science; and Sonoo Thadaney, executive director of Presence and of the Program in Bedside Medicine/Stanford 25, are quoted in this piece. Verghese and Thadaney were also featured in a segment on All Things Considered.

Next Avenue, 04/25/19

--Health Care Town Hall Event

During this Facebook Live discussion, VJ Periyakoil addressed how patients can talk to their doctor about what matters most to them. Periyakoil is associate professor of medicine and director of palliative care education and training.

Scope, 04/25/19

--Al Letson explores ties between journalists and doctors at Medicine and the Muse symposium

Poet and radio host Al Letson explored the art and power of listening with medical students and others at Stanford's Medicine and the Muse symposium. The event also featured student performances and readings. Audrey Shafer, professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and director of the Stanford Medicine & the Muse program, is quoted here.

Scope, 04/24/19

--Financial transparency may diminish trust in doctors, new study finds

A Stanford study has found that mandated public disclosure of physicians' financial ties may have diminished trust in all physicians. Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is lead author.

Scope, 04/23/19

--The future hope of “flash” radiation cancer therapy

This post highlights a recent segment on "The Future of Everything" radio show featuring Billy Loo, associate professor of radiation oncology. Loo and host Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, discuss advances in ultra-fast "flash" radiation therapy, which may kill cancer cells with less collateral damage.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 04/22/19

--Identifying the Right Needs in Health Technology Innovations with guest Paul Yock

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Paul Yock, the Martha Meier Weiland Professor and professor of medicine and of bioengineering and the founder and director of the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign, explains what needs-based innovation looks like in health technology and details the process of identifying the right needs. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics, of medicine and of biomedical data science, is host.

Wall Street Journal, 04/17/19

--Scientists restore some brain function after death in animal experiments

In a new study, scientists have restored some cellular activity to brains removed from pigs obtained at a slaughterhouse. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, was not involved with the research but provides comment in this article.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 04/08/19

--New Research on Drug-Resistant Cancers with guest Tony Oro

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Anthony Oro, the Eugene and Gloria Bauer Professor and a professor of dermatology, discussed promising DNA research that could be helpful in drug developers' work to combat treatment-resistant cancers. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, is host.

TED Blog, 04/15/19

--“One with each other”: Notes from Session 1 of TED 2019 Fellows talks

This post highlights talks and performances from the TED Fellows program. Laurel Braitman, adjunct professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine and writer-in-residence at the medical school, is delivered at talk and is mentioned here.

Forbes.com, 04/15/19

--How to prevent the iPatient

This piece discusses the importance of clinical examination skills and references the work of Abraham Verghese, the Linda R. Meier and Joan F. Lane Provostial Professor and vice chair for the theory and practice of medicine.

Stanford Medicine press release, 04/11/19

--Flagging a cholesterol-raising disease using AI

Stanford researchers have created an algorithm to detect familial hypercholesterolemia, a hard-to-diagnose genetic disease. Joshua Knowles, assistant professor of medicine, and Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, share senior authorship of the research.

Scope, 04/09/19

--Could a vibrating glove become part of stroke therapy?

Stanford researchers are collaborating to develop a vibrating glove that could improve hand function following a stroke if worn for several hours a day. Maarten Lansberg, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, is a collaborator of the new development.

Seattle Times, 04/08/19

--Alexa in the #MeToo era: How to protect sensitive disclosures to digital assistants

This opinion piece, written by Adam Miner, instructor in the psychiatry and behavioral sciences, and Steven Asch, professor of medicine, discusses home-based digital assistants and data sharing for sensitive disclosures.

TIME, 04/09/19

--Why does medicine cost so much? Here's how drug prices are set

Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is quoted in this article on the rising costs of brand-name drugs.

Washington Post, 04/07/19

--There’s a serious problem plaguing some older people: Loneliness

This article discusses how new approaches are needed to address loneliness among the elderly. VJ Periyakoil, associate professor of medicine and director of palliative care education and training, is quoted here.

Scope, 04/02/19

--Immune cell turned biomarker: Predicting severity of lung scarring

By scouting for a particular immune cell in the blood, scientists can tell which patients with a lung-scarring disease are at higher risk for death. Purvesh Khatri, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, and Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, are senior authors of this study.

All Things Considered (NPR), 04/01/19

--How Can Doctors Be Sure A Self-Taught Computer Is Making The Right Diagnosis?

This segment discussed the promises and pitfalls of applying artificial intelligence (AI) to medical care. Matthew Lungren, assistant professor of radiology and associate director of the Stanford Center for Artificial Intelligence in Medicine and Imaging, and graduate student Pranav Rajpurkar, who developed a deep learning algorithm that evaluates chest X-rays for signs of disease, were featured. The work of Nigam Shah, associate professor of medicine and of biomedical data science, and Stephanie Harman, clinical associate professor of medicine, on the use of AI in palliative care, is also referenced here.

 

March

Stanford News 03/28/19

--Physicians with multiple malpractice claims are more likely to stop practicing or go solo, Stanford study finds

Stanford researchers have found that physicians with poor malpractice liability records were more likely to cease practice or to shift to smaller or solo practice groups. David Studdert, a professor of medicine and of law, is lead researcher of the study, and Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, is co-author of the study.

Business Insider, 03/27/19

--Bill Gates is worried about gene editing worsening inequality. Now a top ethicist is raising new red flags. 

High prices for gene therapies could mean that only those with money have access, raising concerns. Holly Tabor, associated professor of medicine, is included here. 

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 03/25/19

--Stanford smartphone app to treat and track autism in kids

During this segment, Dennis Wall, associate professor of pediatrics and of biomedical data science, talked about his work developing a smartphone app that could simultaneously treat and track autism. Russ Altman is host.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 03/25/19

--Cancer therapy's impact on cognitive function

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Michelle Monje, associate professor of neurology and neurological sciences, discussed immunotherapy as a promising new approach to the treatment of brain cancer in children. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, is host.

03/25/19

--Putting Bioethics into Practice

Bioethics is a rapidly evolving, more-relevant-every-day kind of field. The Department of Medicine's Annual Report highlights the Center's very own Kate Luenprakansit, MD, clinical assistant professor of hospital medicine and clinical bioethicist, and how it has become a major part of her life’s work.

Scope, 03/21/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Thumbs up for Mediterranean

In the ninth and final post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, examine the Mediterranean diet.

San Jose Mercury News, 03/17/19

--Opinion: Teens with anti-vax parents should have right to be vaccinated

Recent outbreaks of measles raise the issue of whether teens should have the right to be vaccinated even if their parents are opposed. This op-ed, written by Alyssa Burgart, clinical assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, argues that teens should be able to make that decision.

San Jose Mercury News, 03/14/19

--Stanford scientist joins call for moratorium on gene-edited babies

A group of prominent scientists and bioethicists is calling for a global moratorium on any new attempts to bring gene-edited babies into the world. 18 researchers, including Stanford’s Paul Berg, the Robert W. and Vivian K. Cahill Professor of Cancer Research, Emeritus, wrote a commentary published in Nature, and is quoted in this story. The piece is highlighted here and in articles from Discover Magazine, Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News, and Science Magazine. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, provides comment in an article on Science News.

Scope, 03/14/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Low fat revival?

In the eighth post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, break down low-fat diets.

Scope, 03/07/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: The lowdown on low carb

In the seventh post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, examines down the pros and cons of a low-carb diet.

Washington Post, 03/05/19

--Two Maryland bills are the state’s latest attempt to rein in drug prices

This piece outlines proposed state legislation in Maryland that would require drug companies to provide more information about their products and create a commission to review prices and set limits on what insurers, pharmacies and hospitals must pay. Michelle Mello, professor of law and of health research and policy, provides comment.

San Jose Mercury News, 03/05/19

--Unleashing terror? How to catch deadly mail-order DNA

Fielding thousands of requests for custom-built DNA, gene synthesis companies in the Bay Area are striving to remain vigilant about possible efforts to create biohazards. Quoted here is Mildred Cho, associate director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and professor of pediatrics and of medicine.

San Jose Mercury News, 03/05/19

--East Bay parents want to preserve dead son’s sperm — but what next?

This piece examines the ethical quandary raised by parents’ efforts to save their son’s sperm after his death at 21. Barry Behr, professor of obstetrics and gynecology, is quoted. Also mentioned is the work of David Magnus, Thomas A. Raffin Professor in Medicine and Biomedical Ethics, director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, and professor of pediatrics and of medicine.

 

February

Shots (NPR), 02/28/19

--States move to restrict parents' refusal to vaccinate their kids

In response to the measles outbreak, a growing number of states are making it harder for parents to obtain an exception from vaccination requirements. Michelle Mello, professor of health research and policy and of law, is quoted in this article.

Scope, 02/28/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Hurrah for raw food?

In the sixth post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, examines the pros and cons of a raw food diet. 

SCOPE, 2/28/19

--Inheritance: On family secrets, genetics and ethics

With a DNA test, Dani Shapiro discovered that the man she had thought was her father was not. She discussed the finding, and her writing, on campus.

Washington Post, 02/25/19

--Anti-vaxxers face backlash as measles cases surge

Lawmakers in some states have proposed legislation to tighten vaccine exemptions as Washington state faces the worst measles outbreak in more than two decades. Michelle Mello, professor of law and health research and policy, offers insights here.

Stanford Radio, 02/23/2019

--The Future of Everything

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Billy Loo, an associate professor of radiation oncology, discussed how advances in radiation therapy using new accelerator-based technology, PHASER, will develop a flash delivery system that aims to shrink tumors in less than a second. Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, is host.

Scope, 02/21/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Going gluten-free

In the fifth post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, analyzes the gluten-free diet.

Scope, 02/14/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: How ketogenic should you go?

In the fourth post in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, examines pros and cons of a ketogenic diet.

CNN.com, 02/12/19

--Facebook screens posts for suicide risk, and health experts have concerns

Facebook continues to refine its efforts to identify and help people who may be considering self-harm, but experts have found transparency and ethical problems with the social media platform’s latest tools and guidelines. David Magnus, the Thomas A. Raffin Professor and director of the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, is quoted in this story.

Forbes, 02/11/19

--Rethinking medical ethics

Traditional medical ethics are being challenged by developments such as AI. Danton Char, assistant professor of anesthesiology, perioperative and pain medicine, is mentioned here.

Scope, 02/07/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Vegetarian is healthy if you tread carefully

In the third piece in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, point out the pros and cons of a vegetarian diet.


January

Scope, 1/31/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: The paleo diet isn’t just for cavemen

In the second piece in the series A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, along with Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor and a professor of medicine, examines the paleo diet.

SLS Blog, 1/30/19

--Stanford’s Michelle Mello on Latest Measles Outbreak

In light of a recent measles outbreak in Washington state, law Professor Michelle Mello discusses the disease, vaccination and the law.

Bloomberg BNA, 1/29/19

--How can patients make money off their medical data?

Some patients are exploring how to monetize their medical data, which raises a variety of ethical issues. Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics and director of the Center for Law and the Biosciences, provides comment here.

Wired, 1/28/19

--A controversial fertility treatment gets its first big test

Mitochondrial replacement therapy — a technique often referred to as three-person IVF — is gaining ground in Europe, where a pilot trial is now under way. Hank Greely is quoted in this article.

The Future of Everything (Stanford Radio), 1/28/19

--The Future of Everything with Russ Altman: "Breaking down DNA with guest Carlos Bustamante"

In a recent segment on Stanford Radio, Russ Altman, the Kenneth Fong Professor and professor of bioengineering, of genetics and of medicine, discussed the potential of genomics and data science to improve health with guest Carlos Bustamante, professor of biomedical data science and genetics.

Scope, 1/24/19

--A skeptical look at popular diets: Stick to 5 rules for healthy eating

In the first post in the series, A Skeptical Look at Popular Diets, Randall Stafford, professor of medicine and director of the Program on Prevention Outcomes and Practices, writes that picking a particular diet is not that important. Christopher Gardner, the Rehnborg Farquhar Professor, also contributed to the piece.  

STAT News, 1/24/19

--After ‘CRISPR babies,’ international medical leaders aim to tighten genome editing guidelines

The National Academy of Science is planning to tighten guidelines on genome editing after the birth of the “CRISPR babies.” Hank Greely, with the Stanford Center for Biomedical Ethics, is quoted in this story.

STAT News, 1/16/19

--Purdue cemented ties with universities and hospitals to expand opioid sales, documents contend

Newly released details about the close relationship Purdue Pharma pursued with universities and hospitals have raised conflict-of-interest concerns. Michelle Mello, professor of law and health research and policy, provides comment in this story.

Scope, 1/9/19

--Watch list: 10 recommended films about medicine

In this blog post, Maren Monsen, director of the Program in Bioethics and Film; Diana Farid, clinical instructor of medicine; and Bronwyn Scott, a second year medical student, suggest a few worthwhile movies with medical themes.