November 6, 2018: Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine Awards Seed Funding to Five Projects

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Beckman Center awards seed funding to five projects

Innovative Technology Seed Grants

Stanford, CA — November 6, 2018 — The Beckman Center for Molecular and Genetic Medicine recently awarded over $1 million over a two-year period in Technology Development Seed Grants to five teams of investigators.

“We had an outstanding response and applicant pool. With so many extraordinary and innovative proposals, we decided to make five awards this year rather than the originally planned three,” said the Beckman Center Director, Lucy Shapiro, PhD.

The Beckman Center at the Stanford University School of Medicine has conducted a highly competitive technology development seed grant program since 2002, in which pairs of investigators representing different disciplines propose risky but high-pay-off experiments in technology innovation. Projects funded under this program represent a broad array of scientific areas.

The Beckman Technology Development Seed Grant Program has funded over 50 projects, resulting in promising outcomes that include published papers, grants and patents, and media coverage. This round of recipients will receive a total of $216,000 ($100,00 per year in direct costs for two years, as well as $16,000 in infrastructure charges). The grant-receiving projects and their investigators are:

A Next-Generation Imaging Technology for Human Tissue Atlases

• Pehr Harbury, PhD, Department of Biochemistry

• Tushar Desai, MD, Department of Internal Medicine

Developing FFPE-Optimized CODEX to Reveal the Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma Tumor Microenvironment in Response to Immunotherapy

• Garry Nolan, PhD, Department of Microbiology and Immunology

• Youn Kim, MD, Department of Dermatology

Optical Tools to Assess Neuronal Function in Human Stem Cell-Based Disease Models

• Marius Wernig, MD, PhD, Department of Pathology (Stem Cell Institute)

• Alice Ting, PhD, Departments of Genetics and Biology

Scalable Long-Term DNA Storage with Error Correction and Random-Access Retrieval

• Tsachy Weissman, PhD, Department of Electrical Engineering

• Hanlee Ji, MD, Department of Medicine (Oncology)

Targeting the Influenza Matrix Layer Through Hyper-Stabilization

• Karla Kirkegaard, PhD, Department of Genetics

• Wah Chiu, PhD, Department of Bioengineering

 

For more information, press only:
Naomi Love
(650) 723-8423
naomi.love@stanford.edu