Faculty

Laura D. Attardi, Ph.D., Principal Investigator

Emailattardi@stanford.edu

Phone: (650)725-8424 Fax: (650)723-7382

Education: Ph.D., Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley, 1994
B.A., Biochemistry, Cornell University, 1988

Stanford Profilehttp://med.stanford.edu/profiles/Laura_Attardi/

Lab Members

Research Associates

Stephano Mello, Ph.D., 
Basic Life Sciences Research Associate
Emailssmello@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-5261
Education: Ph.D., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, 2006 
M.Sc., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, 2002 
B.Sc., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil, 1998
Research Interests: p53 and Pancreas Cancer

Kathryn Bieging-Rolett, Ph.D., 
Basic Life Sciences Research Associate

Emailkbieging@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-5261
Education: Ph.D., Virology, Northwestern University, 2010 
B.S., Biology, Macalester College, 2004
Research Interests: Understanding Mechanism of p53 Action

Postdoctoral Fellows

Nitin Raj, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow

Emailrajnitin@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-5261
Education: Ph.D., Genetics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, 2012 
M.Sc., Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University, India, 2005 
B.Sc., Biotechnology, Bangalore University, India, 2003
Research Interests: Characterization of the p53 protein interactome by affinity purification and
mass spectrometry

Liz Valente, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow

Emaillvalente@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-5261
Education: Ph.D., Molecular Genetics, University of Melbourne, Australia, 2014
BBiomedSC, Biochemistry, La Trobe University, Australia, 2008
Research Interests: p53 in Tumor Suppression

Margot Bowen, Ph.D., Postdoctoral Fellow

Emailmeb24@stanford.edu
Phone: (650) 723-5261
Education: Ph.D., Genetics, Harvard University, 2014 
B.S., Biology, Duke University, 2008
Research Interests: Inappropriate activation of p53 is thought to contribute to the pathology
of several human developmental disorders such as CHARGE syndrome and Treacher Collins syndrome.
To gain insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these syndromes, I am using
mouse models to study the consequences of p53 activation during development. 

Graduate Students

Brittany Flowers, Graduate Student

Email: bflowers@stanford.edu

Phone: 

Education: B.S., Biology, College of William and Mary, 2013

Research Interest: I am studying the role of tumor suppressor protein p53 in pancreatic cancer. Using mouse models of pancreatic cancer, I aim to understand how loss of p53 activity leads to cancer development. My work will elucidate the mechanisms of tumor suppression by wild-type p53 in pancreatic cancer.

Alyssa Kaiser, Graduate Student

Email: alyssk@stanford.edu

Phone: 

Education: B.S., Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Michigan 2015

Research interest: My research focuses on the role of p53 in non-small cell lung cancer. Using in vitro and in vivo models, I aim to identify the mechanisms and downstream targets of p53 most important for suppressing tumorigenesis in the lung. I am also studying how p53 induces regression of lung adenocarcinoma.

Tony Boutelle, Graduate Student

Email: aboutell@stanford.edu

Phone:

Education: B.S. Biology and Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2016

Research Interest: My research focuses on characterizing non-canonical p53 target genes as tumor suppressors. By investigating the potency of these genes as tumor suppressors in a mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma, we hope to better understand the mechanisms by which p53 antagonizes carcinogenesis. I am also interested in elucidating therapeutic targets that are synthetic lethal to cells with p53 mutations.
 

Research Personnel

Aryo Sorayya, Life Science Research Professional

Email: asorayya@stanford.edu

Phone: (650) 723-5261

Education: B.S., Biology, Stanford University, 2017

Research Interest: My work investigates the effects of p53-over-activation in development and how such stabilization gives rise to congenital defects through cardiovascular and neural dysfunction. Further understanding the early role of p53 is critical in order to create improved treatments for human developmental disorders.

Undergraduate Students

Clare Moffatt, Undergraduate Student

Email: cmoffatt@stanford.edu

Education: B.S. Candidate in Biology, Class of 2018

Research Interest: My research focuses on p53 protein-protein interactions identified by affinity purification and mass spectrometry. In particular, I aim to characterize novel transcriptional co-factors of mouse p53, validate their interactions and determine how they may function in regulating p53 target gene expression and tumor suppression.