Head and Neck Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management

Faculty

Contact Us

Stanford H&N Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management Program (SAAMP)
E-mail: nek@stanford.edu

Current faculty members include: Dr. Vladimir Nekhendzy (Chief of the Division and SAAMP Director), Dr. Erin Bushell, Dr. Alexander Butwick, Dr. Jeremy Collins, Dr. David Drover, Dr. Sara Goldhaber-Fiebert, Dr. Maeve Hennessy, Dr. Kevin Malott, Dr. Amit Saxena and Dr. Brita Mittal (H&N fellow).

Vladimir Nekhendzy, M.D., is Clinical Professor of Anesthesiology and Otolaryngology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. Originally from St. Petersburg, Russia, Dr. Nekhendzy graduated from Pavlov Medical School in 1979. He completed anesthesia residency training at St. Petersburg Institute for Advanced Training for Physicians in 1985, and University of California, San Francisco in 1996.

After completing a research fellowship at Stanford (Dr. Mervyn Maze’s lab), Dr. Nekhendzy joined Stanford Anesthesia Department in 1997. He has been Chief of H&N Anesthesia Division and Director of Advanced Airway Management Program since their inception, in 1998. He also serves as Director of Clinical Fellowship in H&N Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management, offered by Stanford Anesthesia Department since 2009. Full description of the fellowship training is available at: http://med.stanford.edu/anesthesia/education/clinical_fellowship.html

Dr. Nekhendzy’s major clinical, teaching and research activities are centered on perioperative care of patients undergoing a wide variety of otolaryngologic, neurotologic, maxillofacial, orthognatic, and facial plastic surgical procedures, and on the use of advanced airway management devices and techniques. He has authored several chapters on ENT anesthesia in major textbooks, lectured extensively nationally and internationally, and directed numerous workshops on difficult airway management.

Dr. Nekhendzy's major clinical interests outside of H&N anesthesia include non-invasive brain stimulation and the emerging mobile health (mHealth) clinical platforms.

Erin Bushell, M.D., is a Clinical Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology in the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Erin earned her B.S. in nursing from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and worked for five years as an ICU nurse before attending medical school at Stanford. She remained at Stanford to complete her anesthesia residency, a fellowship in Simulation and Patient Safety, and a fellowship in Advanced Clinical Anesthesia.

When she isn't caring for patients or teaching residents, Erin enjoys cooking, hiking, yoga, and spending time with her friends, her adult children, and her pets.

Dr. Alexander Butwick, MBBS, FRCA, MS is an Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. He received his medical degree and anesthesia residency training in the United Kingdom. At Stanford, Dr. Butwick completed an obstetric anesthesia fellowship, and later followed with M.S. in Epidemiology.

Dr. Butwick has a long-standing interest in H&N anesthesia and advanced airway management, although obstetric anesthesia remains his main focus. Dr. Butwick has previously won the Gertie Marx award (best paper by a junior investigator) at the Annual Meeting of the Society for Obstetric Anesthesia and Perinatology (SOAP) and the award for best paper at the Obstetric Anaesthetists’ Association (OAA) Annual Meeting. He gave the prestigious Gerard W. Ostheimer “What’s new in Obstetrics?” lecture at the 2012 SOAP Conference in Monterey, California, and has presented at other national and international obstetric anesthesia meetings.

Dr. Butwick serves on the editorial board of the International Journal of Obstetric Anesthesia, and is an ad-hoc reviewer for over 8 anesthesia and obstetric journals. He is establishing himself as a clinician investigator with research interests in preventive and therapeutic strategies for the management of obstetric hemorrhage, maternal hemostasis and hematologic-related outcomes-based research in obstetrics. Dr. Butwick has previously received institutional and industry funding for clinical trials in obstetrics, and is currently a recipient of federal funding (K23) from the National Institute of Health (NIH).

Jeremy Collins, M.D., is Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. Originally from Leeds, England, Dr Collins graduated from Aberdeen Medical School, Scotland in 1988 and completed anesthesia residency at Sheffield Teaching Hospitals as a Fellow of the Royal College of Anesthetists.

Since becoming a member of Stanford faculty in 2002, he has been actively involved in the Stanford Head and Neck Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management Program and is Co-Director of the Difficult Airway and Fiberoptic Course.

His clinical and research interests include airway management in both morbidly obese and pregnant patients, and has authored several book chapters and papers on these topics. He has lectured both nationally and internationally and taught at difficult airway workshops around the world.

David Drover, M.D., is Professor of Anesthesiology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.

My clinical interests are anesthesia care for patients undergoing H&N procedures, neuro-anesthesia, and liver and kidney transplants. I spend about 50% of my time performing clinical research. I have served as a principal investigator and co-PI for many pharmacokinetic studies during my career. I have a strong interest in neonatal and pediatric clinical pharmacology and expertise in pharmacometrics. I have many active as well as completed research projects related to the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drugs in adult and pediatric populations.

As an anesthesiology researcher, one of my major interests is in the clinical pharmacology of opioids and anesthetics. I use my knowledge of clinical pharmacology to pursue a majority of anesthetics by total intravenous techniques, which are highly beneficial in H&N surgery.

Sara Goldhaber-Fiebert, M.D., is Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. After anesthesia residency at MGH, Sara completed in 2007 a Simulation and Patient Safety Fellowship at Harvard’s Center for Medical Simulation. Her Stanford roles in patient safety, simulation, and quality improvement include: co-director of Evolve simulation program for residents, faculty for many simulation courses ranging from medical students to faculty instructor courses, a founding member of Stanford Anesthesia Cognitive Aid Group (http://emergencymanual.stanford.edu/), director for Stanford’s interprofessional emergency manual clinical implementation and training, and member of Stanford Hospital’s Quality Patient Safety and Effectiveness Committee.

Nationally, her roles include chair of Society for Simulation in Healthcare’s Anesthesia Section, member of ASA’s Quality Management Departmental Administration Committee and of Society for Education in Anesthesia’s Simulation Committee. Sara is on the steering committee of the global Emergency Manuals Implementation Collaborative (EMIC, www.emergencymanuals.org). EMIC shares free resources on why and how to implement emergency manuals and context-relevant sets of cognitive aids, such as crisis checklists.

More about Sara’s research and academic work can be found at https://med.stanford.edu/profiles/sara-goldhaber-fiebert or if you are a local leader interested in “Why and How to Implement Emergency Manuals” see a graphically-illustrated video of the evidence and tips here.

Kevin Malott, M.D., is Clinical Associate Professor of Anesthesiology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine. He received a B.S. in biology from U.C. Irvine, his M.D. at Dartmouth, and completed his anesthesia residency at Stanford.

Dr. Malott divides his clinical time equally between Stanford University Medical Center and Lucille Packard Children’s Hospital with a focus on anesthesia for H&N surgery and pediatric anesthesia respectively. He has volunteered extensively on medical missions, providing anesthesia care in the third world countries.

In his spare time, Dr. Malott enjoys hiking, jogging, playing hockey and attending Bay Area sporting events with his wife and four children.

Amit Saxena, M.D., is a Clinical Instructor of Anesthesiology at the Department of Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.

A Bay Area native, Dr. Saxena was born in Mountain View, CA and received his undergraduate degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He received his medical degree from the University of California, San Francisco and then moved south to complete his anesthesia residency at Stanford. During residency he was always attracted to advanced airway management techniques and focused on this area during his last year of training. After completing residency, he was excited to stay on at Stanford as an attending and joined the Head and Neck Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management team.

Dr. Saxena enjoys working with his ENT colleagues, teaching residents on a frequent basis in the operating room, and also teaching at the annual Stanford Advanced Airway Management and Fiberoptic Intubation Course. Dr. Saxena’s current research interests include the use of Transnasal Humidified Rapid Insufflation Ventilatory Exchange (THRIVE) for operative laryngoscopy.

Outside of work, Dr. Saxena enjoys traveling, hiking, and seeing his Bay Area sports teams in action with his wife and friends.

Brita Mittal, M.D., is a Clinical Instructor of Anesthesiology and Fellow in Head and Neck Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management at the Department of Anesthesiology, Preoperative, and Pain Management, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Brita received a B.S. in Materials Science & Engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and briefly worked at Intel Corporation as an engineer prior to obtaining her M.D. at the University of California, Los Angeles. She completed her anesthesiology residency at Stanford in 2016. She is currently a Fellow in Head and Neck Anesthesia and Advanced Airway Management at Stanford and will complete her fellowship in 2017, after which she plans to stay on at Stanford as clinical faculty.

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