Academic Affairs  

Chapter 1: Medical Faculty Organization

1.1 Mission & Background of the School

1.2 History of the School

The School of Medicine traces its origin to the first medical school on the Pacific Coast, founded in San Francisco by Dr. Elias Samuel Cooper as the Medical Department of the University of the Pacific in 1858. Stanford University was founded in 1885. In 1908, the University's Board of Trustees adopted Cooper Medical College as the University's School of Medicine. The School moved from San Francisco to the Stanford University campus in 1959.

1.3 School of Medicine Vision for the Twenty-First Century

Our school is one of the nation’s preeminent institutions for education, biomedical research and clinical care. This will not change. In our vision for the 21st century, we shall continue to be recognized for our extraordinary ability to make fundamental discoveries in biology and biomedical sciences. But we shall also be focused on translating those discoveries into diagnostic and therapeutic applications for improved patient care. We shall institute policies and structures that will encourage productive collaborations, and facilitate the movement from fundamental discoveries to diagnosis and treatment of disease.

We shall continue to attract and retain the highest quality faculty members who will work collectively and who will have the experience, knowledge and insight necessary to respond to new research and programmatic opportunities and to be a central focus for excellence in patient care.

We shall continue to create unparalleled educational opportunities for our medical students, graduate students, fellows and house staff physicians, and to prepare them for leadership careers in medicine and biomedical research. Our medical students will leave intellectually prepared both to grasp and contribute to the growing body of biomedical knowledge and emotionally prepared to care for patients with compassion and respect. Our graduate students and fellows will conduct important basic and clinical research with extraordinary faculty and will leave prepared for career both within and outside academia.

Our medical school community will reflect the richness of America’s communities and will foster a supportive, hospitable environment that encourages the fullest extent of intellectual and personal development for all.

Finally, we shall continue to benefit from being part of a world class university and will take advantage of the opportunities of integration–those that arise from the interface between medicine and other disciplines, from a sharing of ideas, resources and technology, and from access to the rich intellectual environment of the University as a whole.

1.4 Mission of the School of Medicine

The Stanford University School of Medicine provides an educational environment that encourages intellectual diversity and offers stimulation and opportunity for self-motivated students who are interested in developing a scholarly, investigative approach to problems in medicine.

The Mission Statement for the MD Degree Program of the Stanford University School of Medicine, approved by the Senate of the School of Medicine Faculty Council on June 14, 2000 is:

The Educational Goals for the MD Degree Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, revised and approved by the Senate of the School of Medicine Faculty Council, June 14, 2000 are:

  1. To assure excellence in clinical medicine with emphasis on:
    1. Understanding the traditional and emerging areas of biomedical and clinical sciences, including the etiology, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of disease
    2. Understanding the scientific theory and methodology that form the basis of medical discoveries
    3. Utilizing opportunities to explore research and teaching, both broadly defined, in various branches of medicine, with access to the full resources of Stanford University
    4. Using technology to manage information and knowledge effectively and efficiently
  2. To develop effective communication skills with patients, colleagues and the public
  3. To promote leadership training in the various branches of medicine
  4. To promote ethical and moral behavior, the humane and caring practice of medicine and a sense of obligation to improve the health of the public
  5. To promote cultural competency in the science and practice of medicine
  6. To teach the skills necessary to sustain a lifetime of learning

The admissions process is directed to the selection of individuals who will most benefit from this environment. Recognizing the importance of a diverse student body providing a rich educational experience, the School has a strong commitment to identify, recruit and educate students from a wide variety of backgrounds, including minority groups and women.

1.5 History of the School of Medicine

1851 University of the Pacific, oldest chartered college in California, founded in Santa Clara.

1858 Dr. Elias Samuel Cooper (1822—1862) founds University of the Pacific Medical Department in San Francisco.

1861 Dr. Levi Cooper Lane (d. 1902), Cooper’s nephew, joins faculty.

1864 Medical Department operations suspended because some faculty, including Lane, moved to Toland Medical College–later to become University of California School of Medicine–which opened in San Francisco.

1870 Lane and close associates resigned Toland, reorganized Medical Department of University of the Pacific with Henry Gibbons Jr., MD (1840—1911), who had received his MD from the Department in 1863, as Dean.

1872 Medical Department became known as Medical College of the Pacific when, in order to gain access to better classroom facilities, the faculty amicably arranged to have it transferred to University (City) College.

1882 Lane donated new building at Sacramento and Webster Streets. Name changed to Cooper Medical College. Said to be the best facility for medical education in the world, that building was in continuous use until 1959.

1890 Lane donated addition that doubled size of medical school, included lecture halls, labs and other facilities.

1893-4 Lane donated and raised funds for construction of Lane Hospital at Clay and Webster Streets.

1895 Lane Hospital Training School for Nurses (later Stanford School of Nursing) established. Lane Hospital inaugurated.

1908 Board of Directors of Cooper Medical College grants its San Francisco properties and equipment to Stanford University. The College becomes the Medical Department of Stanford University. Clinical programs and some basic science courses continue at San Francisco facilities; some basic sciences taught on campus.

1901 First class admitted to Stanford University School of Medicine.

1912 Last class graduates Cooper. Lane Medical Library, finest collection west of Chicago, moves to new building, financed by an advance from Stanford and a gift from Cooper Medical College, at Webster and Sacramento.

1917 Stanford Hospital opens on Clay Street, adjoining Lane Hospital, to provide additional beds and clinical teaching facilities. The two are known as Stanford Lane Hospital.

1953 Stanford’s Board of Trustees makes decision to move Medical School from San Francisco to Campus.

1959 The School of Medicine, Clinics and Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital become Stanford University Medical Center; opens on campus. Palo Alto-Stanford Hospital was financed jointly by the University and the city of Palo Alto to secure teaching, research and clinical resources for the University and hospital beds for Palo Alto patients.

1968 Stanford purchased Palo Alto’s entire interest and renamed the hospital Stanford University Hospital.

1994 The Faculty Practice merged with Stanford University Hospital to form Stanford Health Services.

1997 Lucile Packard Children's Hospital merged with Stanford Health Services. Stanford Health Services merged with University of California San Francisco Medical Center and UCSF Faculty Practice in the first such merger of its kind between private and state medical centers, known as UCSF Stanford Health Care.

1999 UCSF Stanford Health Care merger dissolved to form Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

1.6 SCHOOL OF MEDICINE DEANS

John Maxson Stillman
Acting Executive Head 1910,1911

Ray Lyman Wilbur (1875,1949)
Dean 1911,1916

William Ophuls (1871,1933
) Dean 1916-1933

Loren Roscoe Chandler (1895,1982)
Dean 1933-1953

Windsor C. Cutting (1907,1972)
Dean 1953-1957

Robert H. Alway
Acting Dean 1957,1958
Dean 1958,1964

Sidney Raffel
Acting Dean 1964,1965

Robert J. Glaser
Dean 1965,1970

John Wilson
Acting Dean 1970,1971

Clayton Rich
Dean 1971,1978

Lawrence G. Crowley
Acting Dean 1979,1981

Dominick P. Purpura
Dean 1982,1984

David Korn
Dean 1984,1995

Eugene A. Bauer, MD
Dean 1995,2001

Philip A. Pizzo, MD
Dean 2001, 2012

Lloyd. B. Minor, MD
Dean 2012

1.7 Medical Faculty Organization

1.8 Administrative Structure of the School of Medicine

1.9 Dean

Appointment to this position is made by the Provost and the President of the University after consultation with the Advisory Board, and is reported to the Board of Trustees. The Dean serves at the will of the Provost and the President. The Dean reports to the Provost.

1.10 Vice Dean and Senior Associate Deans

Appointment to the position of Vice Dean is recommended by the Dean and approved by the Provost.  Prior to making the recommendation, the Dean may consult with the Executive Committee of the School.  After the Provost approves the appointment, the President reports it to the Board of Trustees.  A Vice Dean serves at the will of the Dean.

The establishment of a new position of Senior Associate Dean is recommended by the Dean and approved by the Provost .  Prior to making the recommendation , the Dean may consult with the Executive Committee of the School.

Appointment to the position of Senior Associate Dean is recommended to the Provost by the Dean, and approved by the Provost.  Prior to making the recommendation, the Dean may consult with the Executive Committee of the School.  A Senior Associate Dean serves at the will of the Dean.

1.11 Associate Deans

The establishment of a new position of Associate Dean is made by the Dean .

Appointment to the position of Associate Dean is made by the Dean upon the recommendation, if applicable, of the Senior Associate Dean. An Associate Dean may report to a Senior Associate Dean and (if so) serves at his or her will,  with the Dean’s concurrence.  Alternatively, an Associate Dean may report to the Dean and (if so) serves at his or her will.

1.12 Assistant Deans

The establishment of a new position of Assistant Dean is made by the Dean .

Appointment to the position of Assistant Dean is made by the Dean on the recommendation of the Senior Associate Dean (if applicable) .   An Assistant Dean reports to a Senior Associate Dean and serves at his or her will, with the Dean’s concurrence.

 

1.13 The Medical Center

Stanford University Medical Center consists of the School of Medicine, Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital.

Vice President for the Medical Center
Appointment to this position is made by the President of the University after consultation with the Advisory Board and is reported to the Board of Trustees. The Vice President for the Medical Center is a member of the Boards of Directors of both Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Salter Packard Childrenžs Hospital. The Vice President for the Medical Center reports to and serves at the will of the President of the University.

Chief Executive Officer of Stanford Hospital and Clinics
Appointment to this position is nominated by the Vice President and approved by the Board of Directors of Stanford Hospital and Clinics. The Chief Executive Officer of Stanford Hospital and Clinics reports to the Vice President and the Board of Directors and is a member of the Boards of Directors of both Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. The Chief Executive Officer is subject to removal by the Board of Directors of Stanford Hospital and Clinics.

Chief Executive Officer of Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital
Appointment to this position is nominated by the Vice President and approved by the Board of Directors of Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. The Chief Executive Officer of Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital reports to the Vice President and the Board of Directors and is a member of the Boards of Directors of both Stanford Hospital and Clinics and Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. The Chief Executive Officer is subject to removal by the Board of Directors of Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital.

1.14 Departmental Structure

The establishment or abolition of an academic department is recommended by the Dean to the Provost after consulting the Executive Committee of the School. If the Provost recommends approval, the proposal is forwarded to the Advisory Board, which submits a recommendation to the President. The President, in turn, recommends it to the Board of Trustees, which makes the final decision. The rationale for giving departmental status to an academic activity must be strong and well supported by documentation of programmatic need and meeting financial and other requirements.

There are currently twenty-eight academic departments within the School of Medicine.

1.15 Basic Sciences Departments

  1. Biochemistry
  2. Bioengineering
  3. Chemical and Systems Biology
  4. Developmental Biology
  5. Genetics
  6. Health Research and Policy
  7. Microbiology and Immunology
  8. Molecular and Cellular Physiology
  9. Neurobiology
  10. Structural Biology

1.16 Clinical Sciences Departments

  1. Anesthesiology, Perioperative and Pain Medicine
  2. Cardiothoracic Surgery
  3. Comparative Medicine
  4. Dermatology
  5. Medicine
  6. Neurology and Neurological Sciences
  7. Neurosurgery
  8. Obstetrics and Gynecology
  9. Ophthalmology
  10. Orthopaedic Surgery
  11. Otolaryngology
  12. Pathology
  13. Pediatrics
  14. Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences
  15. Radiation Oncology
  16. Radiology
  17. Surgery
  18. Urology

1.17 Department Chairs

A candidate for chair of a department is identified by search or other procedure decided by the Dean, who recommends appointment to the Provost. The Provost, acting on behalf of the President and after appropriate consultation, reviews and approves the appointment. The President reports it to the Board of Trustees. Every department chair serves at the will of the President . The chair is the administrative head of the department, and is responsible to the Dean in matters concerning the administration of the department, including (but not limited to) the departmental operating budget, personnel actions and similar matters.

(a) Terms of Office

(i). Basic Science Departments

Appointment as department chair in basic science departments is normally for a term of five years. Although renewable for one additional term, the chair role is customarily rotated at the end of the initial term to allow the return to a primary commitment to faculty scholarship and teaching. To reiterate, at all times during a term, the chair serves at the will of the President.

(ii). Clinical Science Departments

Appointment as department chair in the clinical science departments is normally for a term of five years, with possible renewal for up to three additional terms (for a maximum total of up to twenty years). The performance expectations for each term will vary. For example, during the first five years, the chair will be expected to develop and begin to implement plans for the department, including recruitment for key positions. Performance review for renewal for a subsequent five-year term will be based on progress toward achievement of goals and benchmarks for the department, as well as on overall performance (including effectiveness as a member of the School's senior leadership). In order to assure opportunities for renewal for the chair as well as the department, school and university, the expectation is that, as a general proposition , clinical department chairs will serve for no more than a total of ten to fifteen years, barring extraordinary circumstances. To reiterate, at all times during a term, the chair serves at the will of the President.

1.18 Acting Department Chairs

An acting chair is appointed to perform the duties of a chair on a temporary basis. The procedure for appointment and termination of an acting chair is the same as for the appointment of a chair. 

1.19 Associate Chairs of Departments

An associate chair is appointed by the Dean on the recommendation of the chair who states the reasons for the recommendation and the qualifications of the candidate for the assignment. The associate chair serves at the will of the  chair, with the Dean’s concurrence.

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1.20 Departmental Divisions and Sections and Division or Section Chiefs

A departmental division or section may be established by the Dean on recommendation of the department chair, who states the academic and administrative reasons and documents the personnel, fiscal, space and other requirements. Divisional or sectional status is reserved for academic activities sufficiently distinctive, extensive and significant to require administrative differentiation for optimum development and management.

The chief of a division or section is appointed by the department chair (with the Dean's concurrence), and serves at the will of the chair (likewise with the Dean's concurrence).

1.21 Program Directors and other School and Departmental Administrative Positions

There are a variety of other administrative positions within the departments and the School of Medicine.  At the level of the School, such positions include (but are not limited to) roles such as institute directors and program directors; notwithstanding any oral or written statements to the contrary, all such administrators serve at the will of the Dean.

At the level of the departments, such positions include (but are not limited to) roles such as residency program directors and clinic directors; notwithstanding any oral or written statements to the contrary, all such administrators serve at the will of the chair , with the Dean’s concurrence.

NOTE REGARDING REGULAR STAFF EMPLOYEES:  When these administrative positions (as well as those of senior associate dean, associate dean, and assistant dean) are held by regular staff employees, the provisions in this chapter are to be read in conjunction with their appointment letters (if applicable) and with applicable policies relating to regular staff employees contained in Chapter 2 of the Administrative Guide.  In many cases, regular staff employees holding these positions are appointed at the level of senior staff and their employment is at will.     

1.22 Executive Committee

The Executive Committee of the School is composed of the following voting members: the Dean (chair of the committee), the chairs of the academic departments of the School, a representative of the Interdepartmental Programs, and the representative of the Faculty Council (see this chapter, below). Nonvoting members are designated by the Dean and currently include the Senior Associate Deans and the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs. The committee is a major consultative body of the School and is advisory to the Dean, who determines the agenda.

The Executive Committee considers confidential matters such as appointments, reappointments and promotions and may consider, at the request of the Dean, and all policies of the School.

1.23 School of Medicine Executive Organization

School leadership includes the Dean, the Vice Dean, School Officers, Department Chairs and Division Chiefs, and the School of Medicine Faculty Senate.

1.24 Faculty

The faculty of the School of Medicine consists of the Academic Council Professoriate and the Medical Center Line.

1.25 Academic Council Professoriate

The Academic Council Professoriate includes Tenure Line faculty at all ranks and Non-Tenure Line faculty at all ranks. The latter consists of three lines: the Clinical Line (to which there have been no new appointments since 1989), the Research Line and the Teaching Line. For definitions and additional information concerning University Governance, see Handbook for Academic Council Faculty, Medical Center Line Faculty, Academic Staff-Teaching and Other Teaching Staff (the University's Faculty Handbook), Chapter 1, Section II: F. For detailed information relative to the Medical School, see Chapter 2 of this handbook.

1.26 Medical Center Line

The Medical Center Line includes faculty at all ranks. For definitions and additional information concerning University Governance, see the University's Faculty Handbook, Chapter 2. For detailed information relative to the Medical School, see Chapter 2 of this handbook.

1.27 Staff

1.28 Academic Staff

Teaching Staff, which includes Lecturers and Senior Lecturers, are appointed by the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs upon recommendation from the Department Chair. For further information, see Chapter 4 of this handbook and Chapter 6—8 of the University's Faculty Handbook. These positions seldom are used in the School of Medicine.

Research Staff, which includes Research Associate, Senior Research Scientist or Scholar, and Senior Research Engineer, are appointed upon recommendation from the Department Chair. For further information, see chapter 4 or contact School of Medicine Human Resources.

1.29 Clinician Educators

Clinician Educators are clinicians and teachers who are appointed by the Vice Dean of the School of Medicine, upon the recommendation of the Department Chair and a vote by the Clinician Educator Appointments and Promotions Committee. For details, see Chapter 8: Clinician Educators of this handbook.

1.30 Other Teaching Titles

Acting Faculty, Emeritus Faculty, Visiting Faculty, Consulting Faculty, Visiting Scholars, and Adjunct Clinical Faculty are teaching titles, but are not members of the School of Medicine faculty. For details, see Chapter 5: Other Teaching Titles and Chapter 6: Adjunct Clinical Faculty of this handbook and Chapter 9 of the University's Faculty Handbook.

The Instructor role is defined primarily by engagement in mentored research and scholarly activities that advance clinical medicine. For details, see Chapter 7: Instructors of this handbook.

1.31 The Faculty Council of the School of Medicine

The Faculty Council of the School includes all faculty members in the School who hold primary or joint appointments in the School.

1.32 The School of Medicine Faculty Senate

The Faculty Senate of the School is composed of:

The purpose of the Senate is to represent and serve as a voice for the faculty in the School of Medicine, and to provide a forum for discussion and communcation, and to collaborate with and advise the Dean on matters related to the Senate's responsibilities and on other matters related to the wellbeing and future of the School, as well as its faculty and students.

The Senate Executive Committee consists of:

The Senate Steering Committee consists of:

Responsibility for all aspects of medical student education is vested in the Senate through its four standing committees:

The powers and functions of the Faculty Senate of the School and its standing committees are detailed in the Bylaws of the Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Senate below.

1.33 Bylaws of the Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Senate

The bylaws of the Faculty Senate can be found here (most recently amended in 2008/09); other information is also available on the Faculty Senate website.

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