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Stanford Medicine News

  • Surprise finding about mastectomy

    The first-ever direct comparison of breast cancer surgeries shows no survival benefit for women who had both breasts removed compared with women who underwent lumpectomy followed by radiation therapy.


  • New potential painkiller

    Researchers have discovered that a compound they developed could potentially serve as a painkiller, with particular utility for East Asians with an alcohol-metabolizing enzyme mutation.


Vision & Leadership

A leader in the biomedical revolution, Stanford Medicine advances the health of adults and children through the integrated clinical, research and training missions of Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford Health Care and Stanford Children's Health.

A Legacy of Innovation

  1. First synthesis of biologically active DNA in test tube

    Nobel laureate Arthur Kornberg creates a strand of biologically active DNA, paving the way for studies of genetics.

  2. First adult human heart transplant in the United States

    Norman Shumway successfully transplants a heart into 54-year-old steelworker Mike Kasperak, who survives for 14 days.

     

  3. First expression of a foreign gene implanted in bacteria by recombinant DNA methods

    Geneticist Stanely Cohen transfers a foreign gene into bacterial cells, which then express the gene.

  4. First successful human combined heart/lung transplant in the world (fourth attempted worldwide)

    Mary Gohlke receives the world's first combined heart and lung transplant in a landmark operation led by surgeon Bruce Reitz.

     

  5. Isolation of a gene coding for part of the T-cell receptor, a key to the immune system’s function

    Immunologist Mark Davis characterizes the T-cell receptor, believed to regulate the body's response to infectious agents and cancerous diseases.

    More about Dr. Mark Davis (PDF)

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  6. Isolation of pure hematopoietic stem cells from mice

    Pathologist Irving Weissman isolates a rare mouse cell, known as the hematopoetic stem cell, which gives rise to all the cells of the blood and immune systems.

  7. First use of gene expression profiling to predict cancer outcomes

  8. Application and expansion of optogenetics, a technique to control brain cell activity with light

    Bioengineer Karl Deisseroth and his team develop a technique known as optogenetics that allows them to genetically alter brain cell activity in mice with light.

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